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Category: Workout I Did

‘YOUv2’ Workouts Focus on the Fun

I had a few different fitness setbacks pile up, so between a cranky achilles on one leg and an IT band flare-up on the other, followed by dental surgery and a cold … let’s just say I’m a little deconditioned and in need of a good beginner workout to get me back in the swing. […]


I had a few different fitness setbacks pile up, so between a cranky achilles on one leg and an IT band flare-up on the other, followed by dental surgery and a cold … let’s just say I’m a little deconditioned and in need of a good beginner workout to get me back in the swing.

And I found it! I’m not sure where I first saw it, but a video of trainer Leandro Carvalho (he’s the Brazil Butt Lift guy) having the time of his life with a room full of “real-sized” women had me seek out his new YOUv2 workout DVD set.

I ordered it and promptly popped the first disc into my DVD player.

OMG, fun! Seriously, I’m in love with this workout set.

It’s not a big, complicated “system” — you get two discs with six 30-minute workouts. They’re primarily cardio but a couple of them focus on bodyweight sculpting.

You get a guide that goes over each workout, a four-week journal for charting your goals, “daily vibe,” and inspiration, a calendar to keep track of your workouts (with a cute backside of motivational sayings), and a Keep It Super Simple Meal Guide that features some good-looking recipes and a weeklong sample meal plan.

These aren’t intense, hard-body workouts by any stretch but that’s not what I was looking for. I glanced down at my Fitbit and saw that my heart rate was at a respectable 150 bpm while in the cardio phase.

Leandro is motivating and cheerful without being condescending — something that often crops up in workouts meant for the less fit. The background exercisers, diverse in age, race, and size, are freaking delightful — none of them fit the typical workout DVD mold, and they all appear to be having a blast. The music has a bit of a Baby Boomer vibe with songs like Love Shack, Hit Me With Your Best Shot, and Let’s Get Loud.

Best thing about these workouts — I promise you can complete them all without any modifications. That alone is a huge motivator. In fact, the only background exerciser doing anything different is the woman wearing weighted gloves for a little more upper-body resistance.

The set is available on DVD through Beachbody and Amazon and is also offered through its Beachbody On Demand streaming channel, which is available on many platforms, including Roku and Amazon Fire. One little extra in the streaming version is that there are kid-focused workouts, featuring younger exercisers.

How do you get back into the swing of exercise after a setback? —Gail



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Workout I Did: Learning to Surf

We all have that one thing that we’ve always wanted to try to but for whatever reason we just haven’t. For me, that thing is surfing. I grew up in the mountains of central Pennsylvania with a family that wasn’t big on beach vacations. It wasn’t until my late 20s that I started spending any […]


We all have that one thing that we’ve always wanted to try to but for whatever reason we just haven’t. For me, that thing is surfing.

I grew up in the mountains of central Pennsylvania with a family that wasn’t big on beach vacations. It wasn’t until my late 20s that I started spending any time near the beach. And yet, the idea of surf lessons still seemed far off.

Then, on a recent trip to Myrtle Beach, my chance finally came — at age 37, I was finally about to check surfing off my bucket list. For having this on my list for so long, I still hadn’t even Googled how to surf. On the plus side, when we arrived on the beach for our morning lesson, I had zero expectations and was open to anything.

We were greeted by our surf instructors, Jack and Nick, who had laid out a variety of longboards on the beach for us. As we looked out at the ocean, Jack pointed out that there was some good ground swell from Hurricane Irma, which was approaching but still a couple days out. But, he pointed out, these are perfect wave conditions for learning to surf. One very important variable was in our favor — yay!

On the beach, Jack walked us through how to position ourselves on the board, paddle out and “pop up” from a belly-down position to standing on the board. Then we worked on refining our stance on the board — which foot goes in front, optimal distance between our feet, and how to find balance.

For people who’ve spent some time working out, the popping up maneuver should seem pretty familiar. I mean, look at this slow-mo video of me and tell that this doesn’t look like a cockeyed burpee.

Once we got that down, we headed out into the water with our instructors. We paddled through the breaking waves close to the beach and settled into a relatively calm pocket of flat water not too far off shore. Our instructors stood beside our boards as we hung out on top, waiting. And when a suitable wave approached, they would give us a push on the board toward the shore and tell us when to start paddling. When the moment was right, they’d tell us to pop up.

To my shock and surprise, on my very first wave I made it to my knees and rode the wave to shore. By my second run, I was up on my feet. From there on, I was on fire. I even caught one wave and rode it all the way into shore until I (literally) ran aground.

At this point, I was grateful for my fitness. It was exhausting to work your way through breaking waves, heave your body up onto the board, and then paddle out using only your upper body fighting the water every step of the way. If I was lucky, I’d get a minute to catch my breath before being pushed right back toward shore and popping back up onto my board. So much upper body and core work went into this process. But as tiring as it all was, I was drawn back out over and over again — totally hooked.

Despite all my success on lesson one, I don’t pretend to think I’m prepared to go beyond the safety of the breaking waves near the shoreline just yet. Everything I’ve read and heard since talks about how long and frustratingly slow the learning process is. But I do wonder — why did I wait so long to give this a shot?

Curious to try it for yourself?

Three Things You Should Know

1. Be prepared to be humbled. Surfing might look pretty, but the reality is that it’s far more difficult than it looks. I found that it was easy enough get up onto my knees out there but it took a ton more power (and courage) to get my feet on the board and then stand up. Wipeouts are inevitable — even for seasoned surfers. You’ll get tossed about by the waves and clobbered over the head with your board — it’s foam, you’ll live.

2. Wear the leash. If it’s not securely fastened, your board becomes a projectile. When you’re up on your board, the waves are trying to rip it out from under you. On a few occasions as I was going under mid-wipeout, I could feel my board being launched forward. The leash was only thing keeping me from losing my board and potentially taking someone out.

3. Start small. You begin by essentially learning to ride the whitewater, the smaller and more frequent breaking waves near the shore. This was plenty for me to deal with. What looks like a small wave from the beach looks massive at it approaches you in the water. Over time, as you get more experienced and build confidence, you’ll move farther out and away from shore.

A huge thanks to my friend Jennifer Mitchell for catching the awesome video of me!

What’s on your fitness bucket list? —Alison



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Sightseeing on the Run: My London Running Tour

I truly believe the best way to get a good feel for a city is by exploring it on foot. I didn’t fall in love with New York until I had an opportunity to stroll the streets from the Lower East Side up to Central Park — but from that day forward, I totally got […]


I truly believe the best way to get a good feel for a city is by exploring it on foot. I didn’t fall in love with New York until I had an opportunity to stroll the streets from the Lower East Side up to Central Park — but from that day forward, I totally got it.

My husband and I recently visited London for the first time, and it didn’t take nearly so long for that city to claim my heart — but maybe that’s because, from the moment we stepped off the train from Heathrow, we spent a lot of time walking around, sometimes getting a bit lost and constantly finding cool new corners of the city to explore.

But, you guys know me — I wasn’t entirely content to just walk. The second I laid eyes on Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, I knew I had to run those paths. Our time was a bit limited, but on our last full day, I set an early alarm, laced up my sneaks, and headed out to get in a few miles.

kensington palace
Kensington Palace — gorgeous view and hey, free wifi!

Running as a tourist is much different than running in your own city. For one, obviously, you are less familiar with the area, so I had a map pulled up on my phone and kept it handy so I could make sure I didn’t get too lost on the way. (And good thing I did. London is amazing, but it’s not exactly laid out like an easy-to-follow grid.) The going was extra slow for me because, not only did I have to navigate loads of crosswalks, but — well, they drive on the other side of the road there, you know, and if you’re thinking that’s only wiggy to someone behind the wheel, let me assure you that it’s also something you need to be mindful of as a pedestrian. There’s a reason most of the busy crosswalks have “Look Left” or “Look Right” written in big letters on the street! So, every time I crossed a street, I stopped for longer than was strictly necessary to make sure I wasn’t darting out in front of a double decker.

But those aren’t the biggest differences. For me, at least, the biggest one is the fact that I tend to stop every half mile or so to look at things. Buildings, flowers, people, pubs that I definitely want to stop in later … I didn’t know when I’d be going back, so the whole time I ran, I was looking, watching, taking it all in, and stopping to really soak it up when needed.

Big Ben and the London Eye
Big Ben and the London Eye. (Not seen on this specific run, but I walked by both numerous times.) If you look closely, you can see the “Look to Your Left/Right” notes on the street.

What’s quite cool about this is that, all in all I ended up logging about five miles — which is considerably more than I’d really planned to do. It wasn’t speedy, and the only time my heart rate really shot up was when my wifi connected in front of Kensington Palace (thank you, FREEPALACEWIFI) and I received a notification that my flight home had been canceled (but I made it home eventually — don’t worry), but my legs got a killer workout, and I experienced a bit of zen at the same time.

With all that in mind, I thought I’d share a few tips for having a super successful, totally touristy run the next time you find yourself in a new city.

london phone booth
If you can get past the flyers for escort services pasted all over every single one of these in the city, they’re awfully picturesque!

Tips for a Sightseeing Run

Safety first. If you’re traveling with someone, either have them join you or tell them where you’re going — and approximately when you expect to be back.

Know where you’re headed … at least somewhat. I LOVE getting myself lost on a run … but only to a certain point. Be aware of areas you might want to avoid, and have at least a loose idea of the direction you want to go. If you’re not sure and are staying at a hotel, ask the concierge. Some might even have pre-planned running routes available for you. If you’re capable of logging some miles, you can often see a lot of sights within a city while you get in your run!

And know how to get back. Sounds obvious, but make certain you know the name or address of where you’re staying. It’s one thing to come back via the same route you took when you left, but it can throw you off if you come home a different way!

Don’t go empty handed. If you don’t know the area, take a map or your phone (make sure you have a map available to use offline if you don’t have data available; there are loads of map apps with that functionality, often for free or pretty darn cheap).

Have a backup plan. In addition to my phone, I had a credit card, my ID (but not my passport) and my public transportation card (pro tip — if you’re visiting London, get a Visitor’s Oyster card. You are welcome) so that if I got way off track or hurt or the weather turned, I’d be able to pop into a cafe, at the very least, or find an alternate way home if needed.

Be aware. I know that, as my heart rate soars, often my cognitive faculties … don’t. Even if you’re sticking to safe areas, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out so you don’t get pick-pocketed, followed, or worse.

Don’t miss a thing. This isn’t a hardcore training run. This is a sightseeing jogging tour that you can take at your own pace, so make it what you want it to be. You can sprint from one spot to the next or take everything in at a slower speed. Just be sure you take the opportunity to really see it all, because hey, that’s why you’re there!

In hindsight, I kind of wish we’d spent part of the previous day running the city at a leisurely pace together. We walked the bulk of the day anyway, and you can get in more running miles than you’d think when you’re stopping to gawk as often as we did. Oh well — next time! (And there will be a next time — I can’t wait to go back!)

Have you ever taken a running tour? Where, and what did you see? Got any tips you’d add to this? —Kristen



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The 20-Minute Workout That Had Us Burning at the FBG Retreat

We held our first ever live retreat earlier this month and, guys, it was AMAZING. Kristen and I will get into the hows and whys and ah-has and ALL of that in a later post (with deets on how you can get involved with fun stuff like that going forward — like here and here and […]


We held our first ever live retreat earlier this month and, guys, it was AMAZING. Kristen and I will get into the hows and whys and ah-has and ALL of that in a later post (with deets on how you can get involved with fun stuff like that going forward — like here and here and here), but for now, we wanted to share the 20-minute workout that had us FEELING IT. Both inside and out. ‘Cause you know that’s how we roll …

If you’re not familiar with the AMRAP style of workout, it means “as many rounds as possible.” So, it’s basically a circuit you go through as quickly as you can (albeit safely and with good form, obviously) for the time allotted — in this case, 5 minutes for each! And be sure to track how many rounds you get through of each. As you get fitter, challenge yourself to go faster and do more. It’s SO fun to see yourself improving!

And, as always, feel free to modify any moves that you’re not feeling that day, so squat jumps could be squats, star jumps can be jumping jacks, etc. Or, kick it up a notch by taking things to a single leg or adding weight when applicable. If you have a specific question about a modification for one of the exercises listed, drop it in the comments!

Try it and let us know how it goes. We all found it to be challenging but doable, which all made us feel pretty awesome afterwards. —Jenn



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Life Lessons Learned From Stand-Up Paddleboard Yoga

I LOVE Athleta catalogs. The women shown are strong, athletic and diverse. They’ve always shown women paddleboarding and I honestly thought I wouldn’t have the opportunity to try it unless I were to go to the ocean. But then a friend of mine recently got her stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga certification (Positive Vibes SUP + […]


I LOVE Athleta catalogs. The women shown are strong, athletic and diverse. They’ve always shown women paddleboarding and I honestly thought I wouldn’t have the opportunity to try it unless I were to go to the ocean. But then a friend of mine recently got her stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga certification (Positive Vibes SUP + Fit) and brought it to Kansas City!

As soon as I saw a date and time on the schedule that I knew I could make, I signed up.

Of course, there were the hesitations. What do I wear? It’s yoga. On water. I was positive I didn’t want to be doing yoga in a swimsuit and she said wear anything I wouldn’t mind getting wet. Check. Then I asked how stable the boards are and she said if you can stand on one foot on dry land you can do SUP yoga. Check.

The day of the class I realized that I wasn’t as nervous about falling in as I was about getting back up on the board. Would I be able to do that or would I be stuck in the water?

When I was out on the water, I realized there are so many ways that this experience mirrors life. There’s the thrill of something new and exciting. There’s the uncertainty leading up to it: Will I fail? Will I recover? Then there was the easing in. And then there was the instability as I was learning something new while applying all my previous experience to this situation. And finally came relief and eventual trust of myself and the board.

About halfway through the class I realized I had a lot more room for movement than I realized. And I was able to take bigger risks. Relax more. Laugh more. Learn to trust myself more.

Then it was over and time to go back to shore.

The day I went might have been the windiest day all month, so on the way back to shore, there was the feeling of getting stuck in the middle of the water going against the wind, no matter how hard I paddled. And I just kept paddling and started moving again and eventually I was back on dry land. Back in my comfort zone, just like real life. Being stuck and working through it.

But I did it. I did this new thing I didn’t think I would ever have a chance to do and I learned about myself and how it would have been so easy to not go. In fact, there were two people who didn’t show up to the class. And there were two people who didn’t show up to the class the night before. So fear could have definitely taken over, but I decided that it was more important to walk through it than it was to hold back.

While I did this new thing, was it scary? Not really. There was a warrior pose that was more unstable than I would have liked, but I modified it and was fine. I survived.

It was the fear of not getting back on the board that was scary — just like life. The fear of not being able to recover from upset is much worse than the actual experience ever is. We learn to move on and get through it and we survive, proving to ourselves how brave we are. And isn’t that what life is? Trying new things and learning to move past the fear? And then choosing to continue living that life, instead of the one based on fear.

The next time I go, I’ll push myself harder and see what happens. I’ll give myself a greater opportunity to fall so I can also give myself the chance to get back on the board.

What life lessons have you learned from new experiences? —Cati



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That Time I Went to the Gym But Came Home and Lifted Wine Bottles Instead

I recently joined Planet Fitness. I’ve been struggling with my exercise regimen recently, so I was excited for the option to have the personal trainer there create a workout for me. The trainer and I met a few weeks ago to create my plan. We decided I’d do 2-3 days per week of cardio for […]


I recently joined Planet Fitness. I’ve been struggling with my exercise regimen recently, so I was excited for the option to have the personal trainer there create a workout for me.

The trainer and I met a few weeks ago to create my plan. We decided I’d do 2-3 days per week of cardio for 40-60 minutes. I have that covered with my weekly indoor soccer games, so that’s perfect for me. On non-cardio days, at least twice a week, I would do the strength workout he designed. I was nervous for this because I’m not used to using anything other than cardio machines.

My first try went like this …

I started with 5-10 minutes on the stair climber, which was great. I’m comfortable with that. It’s like cardio on steroids. It definitely gets my heart rate going. And from way up there, I could scope out the next stuff I needed to do. This was important because it was really busy that evening.

After that warm-up, it was time to move on to the weight machines. I’m less comfortable with them, but it’s a “judgment free zone,” so it doesn’t matter if I stand and look at the pictures on the machines a little longer than necessary to fully understand what to do. But first, I had to find an available machine I was supposed to use. That was pretty challenging considering how packed it was (at 8:30 p.m. on a Tuesday). Almost every machine was taken.

I could pick out most of the machines I needed. I spotted the leg press, but it was busy. I moved on to the glute extension. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was supposed to alternate my sets between leg presses and glute extensions. That didn’t happen. I did three sets of 10 reps on each leg at the glute extension machine. I went back to the leg press when it was free.

I tried to go to the hip adduction and abduction machines next, but I didn’t realize I sat down where a girl already had her things. She was about to wipe the machine down, so I moved on. I came back later and did two sets of 15 on each machine. Again, I didn’t realize I was supposed to be alternating sets. I did them consecutively.

I moved on to the lat pull down machine. And, yep, you guessed it, I was supposed to be alternating. This time should’ve been with the chest fly machine, but I couldn’t find it. I did three sets of 12 reps on the lat pull down.

I gave up on finding the chest fly machine and went to the free weight section. But I panicked. I had never used free weights on the gym floor before. I had used them in group classes, but that always includes a lot of guidance. I watched one girl who looked really serious for a while. I got more nervous.

I knew I was supposed to do three sets of 10 curl and presses, three sets of 10 tricep lifts, and three sets of 10 front raises. I had to check with my fiancé Evan, who has an exercise science degree and much more experience weight lifting than me, before I went to the gym to make sure I knew what each of those movements was. I did. But when it came time to do them, I chickened out. I wanted to be efficient and use both arms at the same time, but I didn’t know if that was normal. And it was crowded. And I had been there for a long time already. And I was tired, but mostly, I was intimidated.

So I left.

I decided to finish my routine in the comfort of my own home. I thought we might have free weights, but I wasn’t sure. I couldn’t find them when I got home, so I improvised. I grabbed the only things I could think of that were shaped the same and were kind of acceptable in weight: wine bottles. I weighed them on my kitchen scale. They were only 2.5 lb each, but hey, they got the job done.

I did my curl and presses, my tricep lifts and my front raises. I finished out with two sets of planks for 30 seconds each and 30 v-ups (a crunch with legs extended in the air).

I felt pretty silly for getting scared and leaving the gym, but I was also pleased with myself for finishing the workout, even if it meant sort of making it up.

I went back later that week and did the full workout. Evan helped me through it. I now know what to do for next time, and I definitely know to avoid the busy times to feel more comfortable. I don’t think I’ll need to use the wine bottles again, but in a pinch, they’re better than nothing.

Have you ever had a first-time-at-a-new-gym experience like this? Ever lifted wine bottles? Do tell! —Megan



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Train Like a Beast With This Track Workout

Think track workouts are only for serious runners? You know, the super speedy people wearing tiny shorts as they try to bring their 6:30/mile pace down to 6:15? via GIPHY Think again. Track workouts are great for all kinds of runners — including newbies and back-of-packers. Running around a track (even if it’s not a […]


Think track workouts are only for serious runners? You know, the super speedy people wearing tiny shorts as they try to bring their 6:30/mile pace down to 6:15?

via GIPHY

Think again. Track workouts are great for all kinds of runners — including newbies and back-of-packers. Running around a track (even if it’s not a real track and it’s just a set, visible distance) can really help runners find their different gears, learn what it feels like to push through, and get an idea of what kind of recovery they need before they can push again. It helps build stamina and speed.

But those aren’t the only reasons I love hitting the track.

I’m slower than most of my runner friends, which means that meeting them for any sort of a sustained run generally means I meet them at the start and then we catch up over coffee at the end — we don’t *really* run together if they’re wanting to run their own pace.

At the track, though, it’s different. For one thing, because I’m better at sprint-type workouts than long distance cardio, there’s less of a difference between my pace and my friends’ at the track, at least for the shorter distance workouts. And even if I’m getting lapped by someone, I’m actually getting lapped, which means that I’m at least seeing the same faces throughout the workout. We’re cheering for one another (or at least giving each other finger guns if we can’t breathe well enough to speak), and sometimes, just seeing a friend who’s giving it their all while you’re doing the same is enough to push you to go just a smidge harder.

That was the case for me at Camp Brooks Altitude Training track workout when I was in Albuquerque this spring. (As you might recall, we’re Brooks Running ambassadors and they covered my trip, but everything here is just my honest opinion!) I’ve run with my fellow ambassadors before, and many of them are fast. And when we were teamed up with some elite athletes from around the country, well, there was a lot of speed happening on that track. Even though our paces might’ve differed somewhat drastically, the experiences was shared, and the outcome was the same — we were pushing hard. It was awesome.

Also awesome? The actual track workout we did, which was not one I’d ever done before (and I’ve done a lot of track workouts!), so I knew I had to share. Thanks to Coach Danny Mackey for putting this one together, and to the Brooks Beasts for putting us through our paces. Having professional runners cheering for you and screaming for you to hit your times is every bit as motivating as you might think.

track workout

Brooks Running Track Workout

Repeat the following 3-5 times

  • 3 minutes @ 5k pace
  • 2 minutes @ slow jog/walk
  • 200 meters @ mile pace
  • 4 minutes @ slow jog/walk

The real kicker (for me, anyway) was having the mix of going by time and going by distance — it was a bit of a mind game, which is a good thing now and again when it comes to running, right? I’m not the only one who thinks it’s tough, either. Garrett Heath, one of the Beasts, later told me, “That’s one of the hardest workouts we do, and you guys did great! We expected a lot more carnage.” Glad I hadn’t known that going in!

Are you a fan of track workouts? What’s your favorite? I come back to this one any time I show up at the track without a set plan. Kristen



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Pre-Run Core and Upper-Body Workout

When I’m in a good workout groove, two-a-days are my best friend. I like getting in a good morning workout, but the group runs I enjoy so much with my friends take place in the evenings. So! Sometimes, that means strength in the morning and a run after work. If I’m doing my own workout […]


When I’m in a good workout groove, two-a-days are my best friend. I like getting in a good morning workout, but the group runs I enjoy so much with my friends take place in the evenings. So! Sometimes, that means strength in the morning and a run after work.

If I’m doing my own workout (vs. hitting a class), I try to be really smart about what muscles I’m targeting on a day when I know I’m running later, so I’ve developed a number of strength workouts focusing on the core and upper body. I just received — and love — the new TRX PRO Suspension Trainer. It has adjustable foot cradles — perfect for exercises that you do with your bare feet in the cradles or if you’ve got multiple people with different sized feet using the same suspension trainer.  Plus, it has new antimicrobial handles that fight off germs better than the handles of the old suspension trainer. Awesome, right?

Anyway — that means a lot of my workouts include exercises using a suspension trainer (full disclosure — we’re huge fans of TRX and are also affiliates, so if you wanna pick up a suspension trainer to use at home, here’s where to go!), but you can typically sub that out for a similar exercise using either free weights or your own body weight. Here’s one I did this week … and I’m still feeling it!

Core- and Upper-Body Workout

Do each set two times through before moving on to the next one, resting 20 seconds (or as needed) between exercises.

Want to get your heart rate up a little more? Throw 30 jumping jacks at full intensity in between each set!

Set 1 (feet in cradles)

  • 10 Crunches
  • 30-Second Side Plank

Set 2 (feet in cradles)

  • 10 Pikes (can put feet on paper plates and slide)
  • 40 Mountain Climbers

Set 3 

  • 10 Low Row
  • 10 Biceps Curl
  • 10 Chest Press

Set 4

  • 10 Triceps Press
  • 10 High Row
  • 10 Y Fly

Do you love two-a-days as well? What does that normally look like for you? —Kristen



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A Sneaky Full-Body Workout That’s a Lot Harder Than It Looks

Ever see a full-body workout on paper and think, “Hey, that doesn’t look that hard … ” Well, famous last words, my friends. I swear, sometimes when it comes to workouts, the more simple the WOD looks, the more challenging it is. I certainly know that’s the case with this full-body workout I recently did […]


Ever see a full-body workout on paper and think, “Hey, that doesn’t look that hard … ”

Well, famous last words, my friends.

I swear, sometimes when it comes to workouts, the more simple the WOD looks, the more challenging it is. I certainly know that’s the case with this full-body workout I recently did at The Fit Pit. I mean, none of the rep counts are that high. The row is just 200 meters each time you do it, and there are just three rounds of the circuit.

Again, famous last words.

This whole thing took me just over 20 minutes and I was SWEATING. Believe me, the meters on the rower really add up quickly — as do all of those pull-ups, kettlebell swings and burpees!

The Sneaky Full-Body Workout

Modifications, Because … No Excuses!

Don’t have a rower? Run 200 meters or do 20 lunges!

Don’t have access to a pull-up bar or a TRX to do body rows? Sub these for push-ups or tricep dips!

Don’t have a kettlebell? Grab a dumbbell and do thrusters. No dumbbell? Try hip bridges.

Hate burpees? Try to learn to love ’em with this change in perspective!

Have you ever done a workout that’s way harder than it looks? Tell me about it. And I just might try it because I’m crazy like that. —Jenn



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Want to Get Better at a Certain Movement? Do This Workout

I’m always, always jabbering on about how if you want to get better at the things you’re not so great at, then you have to work on them. But how exactly do you do that? With this workout, that’s how! “Death By … ” Workout Affectionately named “Death By …” at The Fit Pit, you basically […]



I’m always, always jabbering on about how if you want to get better at the things you’re not so great at, then you have to work on them. But how exactly do you do that? With this workout, that’s how!

“Death By … ” Workout

Affectionately named “Death By …” at The Fit Pit, you basically pick a movement that you want to work on and then do it, until you can’t do it any more — following the pattern of doing a rep at the top of every minute (starting with 1 rep at 0:00) and then adding another rep as the top of the minutes tick by. So …

0:00: 1 rep
1:00: 2 reps
2:00: 3 reps
3:00: 4 reps
4:00: 5 reps
And on and on …

Get the gist? (An easy tip to keep track of your rounds/reps: you’re always one rep behind the minute count.) It starts out pretty easy because with the lower rep counts you have more time to rest. And then, by about the time you get to 7 minutes or so, it gets a little crazy.

You can basically do any movement you want to get better at, but here are a few suggestions:

  • Burpees
  • Box jumps
  • Push-ups
  • Push presses
  • Pull-ups

I did the workout twice — once with burpees and then once with box jumps because I want to get better and faster at both of them. I’m happy to say I got through 10 rounds of burpees (which adds up to 55 burpees!) and 15 rounds of box jumps (which adds up to 120 total box jumps!). For 25 minutes total of exercise, it was QUITE the workout. Try it!

What moves will you do “Death By … ” with? I might try pull-ups next … Jenn



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