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Category: Motivation

How to Have a Breakthrough at the Gym (or in Any Area of Your Life)

You guys know how the gym is a metaphor for life, right? via GIPHY Like, how the challenges you face in workouts — be it a race, lifting a heavier weight or conquering a new move, like a pull-up — are a great parallel to the challenges you face in life outside of the gym? […]


You guys know how the gym is a metaphor for life, right?

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Like, how the challenges you face in workouts — be it a race, lifting a heavier weight or conquering a new move, like a pull-up — are a great parallel to the challenges you face in life outside of the gym? I mean, I don’t know how many times I’ve had to deal with something annoying like a tech issue or a flat tire, and been like, oh, hey, I GOT THIS. After all, I did 50 burpees this morning.

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It’s all about changing your perspective. And building confidence. Because when you build confidence in one area of your life by doing something new — maybe something you thought you couldn’t before — that feeling bleeds over into other areas of your life. And that’s awesome. Because confidence feels GREAT. (And looks good on ya.)

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And we want you to feel confident. And amazing. And like everything you truly are. Which is why today we’re sharing ways for you to bust out of your comfort zone in ALL areas of your life. The gym is on there of course — that’s always a good place to try new stuff and we’re certainly in favor of that — but there’s also suggestions for busting out of your comfort zone in areas outside of the gym.

Because just like a breakthrough in the gym can result in a breakthrough in another area of your life, a breakthrough in your career or relationships, can also give you a breakthrough in the gym. Neat, huh?

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Your Career

There’s so much room in the workplace to grow. Maybe it’s by asking for a raise. Maybe it’s taking on a new project. Maybe it’s mentoring someone — or asking someone to mentor you. Maybe it’s applying for a new job or researching how to start your own business. Maybe it’s going back to school.

For Kristen and me personally, we’re putting this one into action by taking the online certification course for Zen Barre (for the record, they offered us this opportunity and we loved the concept so much we jumped at the chance). We’ll be talking about this much more in the coming months, but we are SO excited. Kristen and I have certifications in other areas (her: track/tri and me: personal training/health coach), but nothing like Zen Barre, which puts a mindful/meditation twist on barre. (And, if you guys want to join us in the training, you can actually get 20 percent off with the code “fitbottomedgirls”!) It’s definitely getting us out of our comfort zones and pushing our limits — and who knows what cool things will come from it!

Your Home

Take a look around at the place you live. Is there a home renovation project you could tackle? An area that you could declutter? An art project you could take on? A new recipe you could try in the kitchen? An area that you could plant something new or start a garden? What new thing can you do to make your space more … well … YOU?

Your Relationships

There’s so much possibility to bust out of comfort zones in your relationships. Maybe it’s starting a new one. Or ending one that’s no longer serving you. Or speaking your truth (even when that’s really scary). Maybe it’s forgiving yourself or getting to know yourself better. Maybe it’s taking the path to loving yourself unconditionally or finally breaking your all-or-nothing mentality.

Your Community

Like Toni Carey said in our podcast ep with her, when you see a need in your community, fill it. How could you get out and make a difference in the immediate world around you? Could you volunteer? Go to a community event? Reach out to your neighbors? Make a new unlikely friend? How can you bust out of your daily bubble and met others different from you?

Your Workouts

Again, there’s nothing like a new workout class (hey, maybe you want to take a Zen Barre class!) or a new, kinda intimidating goal to help you see that you can tackle just about anything. I mean, after I ran my marathon, I knew that I could do ANYTHING I put my mind to. I think of that race pretty much any time I am struggling with something. Honestly, pretty much every time I run, I find myself saying: Girl, surely you can get through this 5k; you ran a freakin’ marathon!

Where is a breakthrough just waiting to happen for you? —Jenn



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7 Things You Can Do Today to Be an FBG

You know what it means to be a fit bottomed girl (or guy). You realize you were put on this planet to do more than worry about your weight. And you’re pretty damn aware that dieting really, truly, seriously doesn’t work. You get it. You get us. But maybe you’re still not sure about just what it […]


You know what it means to be a fit bottomed girl (or guy). You realize you were put on this planet to do more than worry about your weight. And you’re pretty damn aware that dieting really, truly, seriously doesn’t work.

You get it. You get us.

But maybe you’re still not sure about just what it is you need to do. Knowing all of this is great, but taking tangible steps toward a healthier, happier future?

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Yeah, that’s next level. And we’re sharing seven things you can do — today — to become an FBG. Some are simple, some might take you a little bit outside your comfort zone, but the one thing they have in common is that they’ll all help you become an even more awesome version of yourself.

Step 1: Find your why.

The real reasons most of us have for wanting to be fitter, leaner, and healthier rarely have much to do with how we look. Not that liking what we see in the mirror isn’t a factor — because it is! But the truth is that when you love who you are, and you make healthy choices stemming from a place of self love (i.e. I’m going to the 6 a.m. bootcamp because I want to be strong and have more energy, versus I have to go to the 6 a.m. bootcamp because I ate pizza and need to work off those calories, plus my thighs rub and deserve to be punished), guess what? You’re far more likely to actually like what you see in the mirror — regardless of how that reflection actually looks. Finding your why requires some digging, and maybe a big of journaling, but once you find it, get ready for your game to change.

Step 2: Figure out how you really want to feel.

Once you’ve got your why, drill down deeper and think about how you want to feel. How do you want to feel when you look in the mirror? When you wake up in the morning? When you meet friends for coffee? When you play with your kids? When you give a presentation at work? When you make love? Then dig deep into what it would take to feel that way, like more effort at the gym, a cleaner way of eating, a keener focus on your mental health. This will help you set goals — and that why you just came up with will help you stay on track as you work toward them.

Step 3: Show kindness … starting with yourself.

When a negative thought pops in, (like, “I’m not fit enough to even run around the block,” or “I have no self control around cookies,) ask yourself if you can see things differently. Maybe you’re not ready to run around the block yet, but what can you do — and how does that compare to what you could do when you tried it the first time? Perhaps you had more cookies today than you would’ve liked, but empower yourself with the knowledge that a new slate starts now — and you truly deserve the effort it takes to make better choices. It’s about progress, not perfection, and each small step you take, every seemingly tiny good choice you make, all add up to awesome results down the road.

Step 4: Then spread that message.

The more you notice — and change your thinking around — negative self-talk, the more you’ll notice it when it comes up with friends. Instead of joining in when your friends start discussing things they dislike about themselves, jump in with positivity. What do you admire about them? Think beyond physicality, too, because although we can fixate on that when we’re on a fitness journey, we all know that there’s a lot more to each of us than a body. Speaking up can be scary, but seeing your friends come around and learn to love their own perceived faults is worth working through a bit of fear. Trust us on this one.

Step 5: Honor — and listen to — your body.

It’s one thing to push yourself to your limits, but it’s another to ignore the messages your body is trying to send. Nutrition and fitness don’t have one-size-fits-all labels, so while the high-protein eating plan your friend who loves CrossFit is following might be perfect for her, know that it might not give you the energy you need. Some people do really well with a diet higher in healthy fats, some folks process carbs well. There are athletes who live for the next ultramarathon, and there are plenty of yogis who’ve found health and joy on their mats. Find the healthy foods — and the activities — you love, see how your body responds, and adjust accordingly.

Step 6: Befriend your fears.

If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you. After all, if the workouts or types of meals you’ve been sticking to for years aren’t giving you the results you want, why stick with them? It doesn’t mean you have to stop doing things you enjoy — because, hey, if you love long walks on the beach or your Saturday morning Vinyasa flow class, stick with it. But don’t avoid trying new things out of fear of the unknown. Join a knowledgeable, fit friend at the gym (or take a class or book a session with a personal trainer) and ask them to take you through the weight room if you’re intimidated. Unable to imagine more than a day or two without ice cream? Commit to nourishing yourself with whole, healthy foods for a few days — and enlist friends or a support group to help you stay accountable. And that leads us to …

Step 7: Surround yourself with support.

The people who love you want you to be healthy — but seeing a friend lose weight and become quite fit can bring up some tricky emotions, too. It’s important to have at least a couple of people in your corner when you’re committing to a healthier lifestyle for the long haul, not only because you’ll hit some obstacles as you get started, but also because, once you get near your goals, it can be easy to fall back into old habits and lose some of the progress you’ve made. The good news? This support doesn’t have to come from people you’re around in person — you can find it in loads of places.

And, sure, we’re a little biased, but we think the support and accountability found in our 10 in 4 Challenge private Facebook group (open to all members who have ever done the Challenge) is one of the best around. Everyone there is on the same page (no Facebook-y pun intended) — they’ve learned the value of meal prep and planning, they understand portion sizes, and they’re all enthusiastic about sharing what’s worked for them in case others find it helpful. Oh, and yes, Jenn, Dave, and I are all in there too, answering questions and offering guidance as needed. It’s a pretty sweet community to be a part of.

Looking for a place where everybody knows your name — and is right there with you on your healthy lifestyle journey? Join us in the next 10 in 4 Challenge! —Kristen



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Podcast Ep 56: Dr. Josh Axe on Natural Health

Get ready for a super informative episode! Dr. Josh Axe is a certified doctor of natural medicine, a clinical nutritionist, a chiropractic physician and best-selling author with a passion to help people get well by using food as medicine. He recently authored Eat Dirt and Essential Oils: Ancient Medicine and operates one of the world’s most visited […]


Get ready for a super informative episode! Dr. Josh Axe is a certified doctor of natural medicine, a clinical nutritionist, a chiropractic physician and best-selling author with a passion to help people get well by using food as medicine. He recently authored Eat Dirt and Essential Oils: Ancient Medicine and operates one of the world’s most visited natural health websites at DrAxe.com.

We chatted with Dr. Axe about everything from functional medicine to adrenal fatigue to what his favorite essential oils are (hint — he never leaves home without his top pick!). Plus, he talks about his daily “spiritual triathlon,” favorite workouts and so much more.

Oh, and did you guys notice our new podcast sponsor? Yay, VARIDESK! Be sure to head on over to their site now to see all the cool active workspace goodies they offer. It’s seriously work- and life-changing! 

Some of our favorite quotes from this episode: 

Podcast Episode 56 Highlights With Dr. Josh Axe

  • The differences between traditional and functional medicine
  • The signs of adrenal fatigue and how to best treat it
  • How your food choices can affect your hormones
  • What causes a leaky gut and how it affects your overall health
  • His favorite essential oils and their different uses (and we share some of our favorites, too!)
  • Best practices for weight loss and the No. 1 food in which most people are deficient
  • The foods he keeps in his fridge and what he eats on a daily basis

Get the episode with with Dr. Axe here or below!

Get more info on our podcast here and be sure to subscribe on iTunes so that you never miss an episode!

Have you ever tried functional medicine? —Margo

Want to sponsor the show? Yay! Drop us a note at advertising@fitbottomedgirls.com and let’s make the world a healthier place together!



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What It’s Like to Be Able to Eat Just One Cookie

I really didn’t think my relationship with food was too screwed up in my 20s. Well, other than a few dalliances with trying to figure out just how few calories I could get away with eating (and obsessively tracking each bite) and subsisting for days at a time on steamed broccoli and Slim-Fast before breaking […]


I really didn’t think my relationship with food was too screwed up in my 20s. Well, other than a few dalliances with trying to figure out just how few calories I could get away with eating (and obsessively tracking each bite) and subsisting for days at a time on steamed broccoli and Slim-Fast before breaking down and binging on Doritos and Chips Ahoy, that is.

Pretty typical for a girl coming of age in the late 80s and 90s, right? It wasn’t much different than what I saw basically everyone around me doing. I sipped my Diet Coke, told my stomach to stop growling and spent a ton of time on the elliptical, because, hey, wasn’t that the true path to a bikini body?

Yeah, hindsight sure is 20/20.

I wasn’t entirely unaware of the fact that I was developing some less-than-ideal habits. I knew that I couldn’t open a sleeve of Thin Mints unless I had someone to share them with … because I would eat them until they were gone. So mostly, I just didn’t open them — until, you know, I couldn’t take it anymore and tore them apart, leaving nothing but crumbs in my wake. And then I’d beat myself up over having no willpower, which felt terrible (because GOLLY do I hate to be criticized, even my myself), so I’d just feel like the most hopeless failure imaginable. The shame spiral started there and worked its way into just about every other aspect of my life, because if I wasn’t a strong enough person to resist a the siren song of Girl Scout cookies, how could I expect to ever succeed at anything? And, also, NO WONDER people didn’t like me and I wonder what other things I’ll fail at in my future …

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Oh, right. I was in a loving relationship, had a whole group of wonderful friends and supportive family, and although I wasn’t exactly in my chosen field just yet, I was moving right up in my place of work (and, unbeknownst to me at the time, would soon move into a career in digital media that would fulfill my dreams and then some).

But it was really hard to see the good stuff, let alone feel grateful for it all, through that toxic haze of self-loathing.

Did I mention I was also coaching youth volleyball at the time? So as I was battling with my own sense of self worth, I was spending a few nights a week trying to drill the love yourself/appreciate-your-body-for-what-it-can-do message into the minds of young women. And no, I didn’t see the disconnect between being a champion of body image one minute and scowling at my stomach in the mirror the next.

I didn’t experience the kind of ah-ha moment that Jenn did, so I feel like every time I tell the story of how I truly came to embrace myself, perceived flaws and all, it’s a little different. There were just so many things that brought me here. And they’re all important.

However, I have to give a lot of credit to the sport of triathlon. The sport got me to really push my limits — and, as I did so, I really had no choice but to learn about nutrition from a place of curiosity rather than judgement. I knew how terrible I felt during my first half marathon (during which I refused to eat or drink anything but water because I wanted to lose weight, and therefore I bonked), and I knew I never wanted to experience that again. As I learned more about what my body actually required to compete and train, my unhealthy associations (hunger with shame, eating with guilt) began to subside.

They eased further as I surrounded myself with more and more people who loved to be active — and also really, really loved to eat. We celebrated long runs and races with meals together, and if there were feelings of having “earned it,” it wasn’t about burning off those calories. It was about sharing things we enjoyed with people we like while celebrating things we were proud of.

At this point in the story, my emotions around food itself were pretty well in check, but my weight and body image? Less so. And while I didn’t consider many foods truly off-limits, I still struggled with binging on foods I really loved but didn’t have often.

So, what happened to change that? More and more tiny steps, every single day. I worked hard to stop negative self-talk about my body. I said kind things to myself in the mirror. I became more vocal in social settings when someone would put themselves down or make a disparaging comment about looks or weight. (I also changed my method of birth control around this time, which I think was a factor in both my mental health and weight — but it was only one of many factors.) I treated myself like I would treat my best friend — not because I was desperate to lose weight, but simply because I knew I deserved unlimited compassion. We all do.

What do you know? Clothes began to fit better, and, when I finally decided to weigh myself, I was at a lower weight than I’d been in YEARS.  Mind you, that was without actually making weight-loss a priority like I had, ohhh, the entire rest of my life up to that point.

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I continued being kind to myself (encouraging others to do the same), and my body continued to respond.

And so did my brain. The more love and acceptance I showed myself — and the less judgment I showed myself when some of those craving-inducing foods appeared — the easier it was for me to have just a cookie, just a bite, or … believe it or not, even just say, “No thank you,” without feeling deprived or restricted or sad. It’s just me respecting my body and what I actually want in that moment.

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Nearly a decade older — and EVER so much wiser.

Now, I fully embrace the idea that I can eat what I want, when I want — but damn if it isn’t an incredible feeling to also know that I can choose to eat just a little bit of it if that’s what I want. Today is not my last shot at a cookie. When I have one, I enjoy the hell out of it. I don’t judge any feelings that might come up while I’m eating it. And when I’m done, I simply ask myself, “Are you satisfied?”

You already know what the answer nearly always is.

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I continue to be astonished at how quickly my body caught on once I wrapped my head around the idea of ditching all that judgment. From here on out, I’mma just leave the judging to Judy, because I’ve got nothing but love to give.

Well, love and support for other women working on their own weight-loss journeys in our 10-in-4 Challenge, and we’ll be kicking off another round in January so feel free to sign up now if you’re interested! —Kristen



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How I Gave Up the Dieting Struggle and Found Myself

“Can you imagine what would happen if the women of the world stopped being worried about the number on the scale?” That’s the single question that changed my life. Rocked me to my core. Was the initial kernel of an idea that led to our mission — and, quite frankly, made me feel like the […]


“Can you imagine what would happen if the women of the world stopped being worried about the number on the scale?”

That’s the single question that changed my life. Rocked me to my core. Was the initial kernel of an idea that led to our mission — and, quite frankly, made me feel like the biggest asshole on the planet.

At the time, I was 20-something, educated, holding a great job in a field I liked and was months away from getting married. I had it all going for me.  And yet there I was, sitting in the chair across from a registered dietitian who specialized in emotional eating and intuitive eating because I was miserable.

Turns out, the “healthy lifestyle” it looked like I was living … wasn’t healthy at all. At least not for me.

Sure, I was working out and eating healthy foods — but my mindset? Not healthy in the least. More tortured than anything. So torturous, in fact, that it lead me to seek out professional help. No one really knew it from the outside (in fact, I was at the time teaching seriously fun group exercise classes and working as a personal trainer off and on — side jobs I truly did love), but I was simply and utterly consumed with my weight, how many calories I ate, and how many calories I burned. I’d overexercise, over-restrict or try some new diet — and then end up binge eating and even hiding the evidence of it.

This happened over and over and over again. As you’d imagine, I put on weight — and began to turn to food to comfort myself. Which, of course, only fueled the self-hate more.

Thinking that there was something wrong with me and that I had no capacity for self-control, I spent years internalizing feelings of shame and guilt, which harbored a deep distrust of my body and myself.

The pressure from society to look a certain way coupled with working in the fitness industry where I had the mindset that I HAD to have a six-pack and see a certain number on the scale to truly be taken seriously weighed (no pun intended) heavily on my soul. I never thought I was enough — and I took extreme measures to try to fit into a box that simply wasn’t me.

Until finally, I couldn’t take it any more.

I was planing my wedding and realized that — unless I changed something fast — I was going to walk down the aisle on my wedding day, consumed with worry that my arms looked fat or that I was barely fitting into my dress. Clearly, this was not how I wanted one of the best days of my life to be.

I wanted freedom from the pressure. Freedom from the arbitrary rules I’d set for myself. Freedom to enjoy the moment — an incredibly important and love-filled day — to the fullest, without interruption, and with a full sense of self.

It wasn’t easy. I worked weekly with this registered dietitian (I am deeply grateful for her work and approach — especially considering this was back in 2007 when it wasn’t even on most of her colleagues’ radars) and, through lots of tears and honesty, began unraveling years of patterns of thoughts that had led me to that place of poor body image and poor self-esteem. The work to transition away from obsessive dieting to intuitive eating wasn’t easy — and in many ways it’s ongoing, as it’s a life-long practice — but, DUDE, was it worth it.

Like, so, so worth it. So worth it, in fact, that looking back, I’m now grateful for that struggle and experience.

Yes, I said grateful.

In addition to leading to the creation of Fit Bottomed Girls, my struggles actually served as a gateway to finding my true self, my passion and my voice. I learned to trust my body, love myself unconditionally, and take my power back from the number on the scale.

Plus, I had one hell of an awesome wedding day.

These days, my mental space isn’t taken up with counting calories or figuring out when I’m going to get to the gym to “burn off” the pizza I had last night. I eat the foods I love with zero guilt. I work out because it makes me feel good. I love myself healthy.

And, now, I even have the privilege of paying my experience forward: by letting all women know that they are more than the number on the scale and helping them to break through, too.

How would your life change if you gave up the struggle and just loved yourself? —Jenn



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How Jodi Ditched the All-or-Nothing Mindset and Lost 8 Pounds

I’ve known Jodi for years. (She’s even reviewed products for us and run with us!) And, for years, she’s been killing it in the gym — tackling all kinds of workouts and classes and this girl is always game for a challenge. But in the kitchen? Welp, nutrition always seemed to be the one thing […]


I’ve known Jodi for years. (She’s even reviewed products for us and run with us!) And, for years, she’s been killing it in the gym — tackling all kinds of workouts and classes and this girl is always game for a challenge. But in the kitchen? Welp, nutrition always seemed to be the one thing holding her back from having the body she wanted. So, when we started our weight-loss with self love program — the 10 in 4 Challenge — I thought she’d be a perfect fit.

I mean, she knew what needed to be done, but she just couldn’t get there without a little extra support … and digging a little deeper. Which she did. And it resulted in … well, I’ll let her tell you …

FBG: What were your goals and expectations going into the 10 in 4 Challenge?

Jodi: To get back on track with my eating and lose weight.

What was the most helpful thing you learned/experienced during the month?

Getting rid of the all-or-nothing mentality. It’s okay to make a bad food choice, but that doesn’t define you or need to continue. It’s just one meal.

What was the thing that surprised you most about the challenge?

I could live without dairy! I don’t like to live without it, but I can.

Were your goals and expectations met?

Yes, I lost 8 pounds, my clothes fit better and I’m back on track with my eating. I am continuing the program.

If you could tell people who were interested in losing weight one thing about the challenge, what would it be?

This is a plan that you can easily continue as a lifestyle. Many “diets” take away foods that cause you to binge when you are allowed to add them back. The fact that I knew I had two free meals kept me on plan during the week. Plus, the daily accountability in the group was a BIG help.

Wanna get results like Jodi? Registration for the next 10 in 4 Challenge is open NOW! It closes Friday evening though, so if you’re ready to change yourself for the healthier inside and out, don’t delay. Learn more and sign up here! —Jenn



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The Real Reason Why Dieting Doesn’t Work

If you’ve been on this site any time at all, you know we’re not down with dieting or any form of strict deprivation to lose weight. (In fact, we wrote a book on it.) So, why is that exactly? Why are our collective panties in such a damn ruffle over dieting? via GIPHY Is it […]


If you’ve been on this site any time at all, you know we’re not down with dieting or any form of strict deprivation to lose weight. (In fact, we wrote a book on it.)

So, why is that exactly? Why are our collective panties in such a damn ruffle over dieting?

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Is it because diets mess with your metabolism?

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Is it because dieting usually cuts out a whole food group (or two) and leaves your body without enough nutrition and energy to feel great?

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How about the fact that dieting is actually called “weight cycling” and has been associated with an increased risk of weight gain and binge eating?

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Or that mainstream media and society puts all kinds of crazy pressure on us to look a certain way that’s totally unrealistic and dieting is seen as a totally normal — even hip and trendy — way to do it?

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Yep to all of that.

But, guys, that’s just the tip of the iceberg on why we have such a strong stance (and mission) against dieting. Because while all of the above is true and terrible, it’s what dieting does to your mind that really pisses us off.

Because, even though restrictive dieting works for NO ONE in the long term and we all know this (otherwise, there wouldn’t be a multi-billion dollar dieting industry out there, which keeps selling to us over and over again), when the average woman fails at a diet, she doesn’t think: Oh, man, THIS DIET SUCKS.

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Nope. She thinks: I suck.

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And she internalizes those feelings over and over again, every time she diets — and every time she diets, not only do the stakes get higher (I’m really going to do it this time!), but the fall is that much harder as well (What is wrong with me? I can’t do anything right.).

Because everyone around us is doing the same thing to lose weight, no one even realizes that they’re putting the blame and shame on themselves … when really, it’s dieting that doesn’t work. FOR ANYONE. We’re just making the same socially accepted bad decision time and time again. We’re not bad, and we’re not failures … we put our faith in the wrong place because that’s what everyone else was doing.

Many of us start this cycle as teenagers or even kids. So is it any wonder that by the time we reach adulthood, we feel as if we’re somehow broken and stuck? Like we have no way out of this on-again, off-again dieting roller coaster? We’ve said this time and time again, but it bears repeating: you weren’t put on this planet to obsessively worry about your weight or diet. You’re more than that.

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What’s more, it’s time that you took your power back. Because, ladies, y’all have better things to do with your time and energy.

And, that, our friends, is why we hate dieting.

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What’s been your experience with dieting? Can you make a vow — today — to never do it again? And if you’re looking for a way to get healthy without the diet, check this out. —Jenn



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Podcast Ep 53: Danielle LaPorte, Part 2

Photo: Catherine Just Hurrah! It’s time for the second part of our amazing interview with empowerment badass Danielle LaPorte (get Part 1 here!). We had such a great time and took down a million notes during our chat with Danielle that it only made sense to divide the interview into two different segments. And this second […]


Photo: Catherine Just

Hurrah! It’s time for the second part of our amazing interview with empowerment badass Danielle LaPorte (get Part 1 here!). We had such a great time and took down a million notes during our chat with Danielle that it only made sense to divide the interview into two different segments. And this second part is all about cultivating your creativity — and honoring your true inner self.

In this ep, we tell Danielle how much we love her truthbomb “Let it be easy” (or LIBE, as we like to say) and how it transformed the Fit Bottomed World. Also, we discuss the creative process she follows to get those truthbombs out to the world (she is a BIG fan of the Evernote app, by the way). Then we get into a subject all the FBGs love — music!

A few of our fave quotes from Danielle in this ep:

Podcast Episode 53 Highlights With Danielle LaPorte

  • The practical and magical ways she creates those beloved truthbombs
  • Her unique approach to remaining real on social media
  • How women can find (and honor) their true selves
  • What her creative process is like
  • How everything in life comes back to being a spiritual lesson
  • Learning how to say “no”
  • David Bowie Mondays and her musical spirit animal

Get the second half of our interview with Danielle LaPorte here!

Get more info on our podcast here and be sure to subscribe on iTunes so that you never miss an episode!

What kind of music do you listen to feel alive and creative? —Margo

Want to sponsor the show? Yay! Drop us a note at advertising@fitbottomedgirls.com and let’s make the world a healthier place together!



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5 Questions With Camille Leblanc-Bazinet

Camille Leblanc-Bazinet, the 2014 Fittest Woman on Earth (AKA winner of the CrossFit Games) and all around badass, is currently recovering from a recent shoulder injury — but using that time to help with a cause that’s near and dear to her heart. We recently got to talk to her about all of that, plus more, […]


Camille Leblanc-Bazinet, the 2014 Fittest Woman on Earth (AKA winner of the CrossFit Games) and all around badass, is currently recovering from a recent shoulder injury — but using that time to help with a cause that’s near and dear to her heart. We recently got to talk to her about all of that, plus more, in this quick (yet deep) rapid-fire interview, on behalf of Rehband and its awesome partnership with Barbells for Boobs (yep, you read that right).

FBG: Why was working with Rehband a good fit for you personally?

Camille Leblanc-Bazinet: I believe in safe and smart training so I can continue to achieve my goals. I trust the quality of Rehband’s products because they are medically classified and patented designs. I’m confident that they will allow me to protect my body so I can continue to train and perform, especially while I rehab my recent shoulder surgery. Rehband collaborates with athletes to develop products we need. Last year I worked together with their R&D team to produce a wrist sleeve based on an idea of mine!

Can you talk a little about their support of Barbells for Boobs and what that means to you?

One out of eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime, and 7 percent will be under the age of 40. That’s why this October (Breast Cancer Awareness Month), Rehband is taking a stand against these statistics by supporting Barbells for Boobs, an organization that mobilizes and empowers people to take action in breast cancer. Through their programs, Barbells for Boobs has impacted over 1,000,000 people and counting, in the form of access to procedures, navigation, connections and support. I’m a large advocate of the importance of physical strength as well as wellness — which means advocating for yourself by taking action over your own health. Through the purchase of pink Rx line products from Rehband (knee, calf, wrist and elbow sleeves) during the month of October, you can not only promote your own physical support, but also sponsor wellness empowerment for women across the country through Barbells for Boobs.

After being named the fittest woman on Earth in 2014 — which is a HUGE accomplishment — how do you continue to stay motivated?

I think that the true challenge is finding the best version of yourself, and any title or prize can’t stop the search to become that. It’s exciting to have rewards and motivation, but I think when your focus is on constant progress and your focus changes to something that has nothing to do with fame or money, true happiness comes through and true enjoyment of the journey also comes through.

What fitness/personal goals are you working towards now?

Becoming the best me! With my business, as a graduated chemical engineer, as a wife, as a daughter, as a sister and as an athlete. My goals right now are to go back to the CrossFit Games healthy and show what I am made of, to try to qualify for the Olympics in Tokyo in weightlifting and to build my brand online.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given about life? What’s the best piece of advice you can give?

Nothing is about you! That’s the best advice I got. We tend to think that the world is against or with us, or make story in our head about why something went a certain way, but the truth is that nothing is ever good or bad and it’s all about perspective. Stuck in traffic? Good, I got to practice my patience. Get injured? Good, I got a chance to learn to move even better, etc.

Now, we’ve heard some great gems of advice, but this one is fantastic, right?! SO, SO, SO true. —Jenn



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Love at First Lift: Meet the Couple Who Got Married at a Planet Fitness

You may think you spend a lot of time at the gym, or maybe you even consider it to be like a second home, but this couple probably has you beat. They feel such a connection to their gym that they recently got married there. And one of the staff members officiated! Stephanie Hughes and […]


You may think you spend a lot of time at the gym, or maybe you even consider it to be like a second home, but this couple probably has you beat. They feel such a connection to their gym that they recently got married there. And one of the staff members officiated!

Stephanie Hughes and Joe Keith tied the knot in early September at their Planet Fitness in the Cincinnati area. Stephanie wrote a Facebook note to Planet Fitness, which responded with the offer to host the wedding. They shut down the location for the day and decorated the building in purple and gold to honor the couple who met and fell in love in there.

When they first started dating, Joe and Stephanie would spend almost every night as workout buddies. They’d continue to hang out there and talk to get to know each other after their workouts. As soon as they were engaged, the couple thought it was a great idea to have the wedding at Planet Fitness.

Their guests agreed that it was a perfect fit for them.

“We had a lot of people compliment us on how cool it was, how unique and fitting it was for us, how fun it was, and how awesome it turned out,” Stephanie says. Wedding guests included the owner’s family, friends who are Planet Fitness employees, and even some friends the couple met there.

The wedding was easy to plan with the help of corporate and the local owners. “I thought it would be challenging,” Stephanie says, “but corporate and the owner actually made it really easy by helping us and answering all of our questions along the way. They let us set it up the way we wanted to set it up and it turned out perfect. We even had a rehearsal.”

The reception included cookies with Planet Fitness’s thumbs-ups logo, barbells, muscles and other gym themes, and the couple each had a pair of gym shoes made with the words “Bride” and “Groom” on the tongues.

After all of the excitement, Stephanie and Joe know their new married life won’t change their exercise habits.

“The gym is a place we love, and we have set goals there,” Joe says. “I think it helps a lot because we have similar goals in and out of the gym.”

“Working out together is kind of like a date for us. We teach each other things and motivate each other,” Stephanie says.

Did you ever meet a significant other at the gym? —Megan



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What It Means (and What It Doesn’t) to Be a Fit Bottomed Girl

So you say you wanna live that sweet, healthy, fit bottomed life. via GIPHY But … do you know what that really means? Do you know what a fit bottomed girl (FBG) actually does? How she treats her dreams, her food, her body? via GIPHY It’s cool! It’s not like FBG is defined in Webster’s […]


So you say you wanna live that sweet, healthy, fit bottomed life.

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But … do you know what that really means? Do you know what a fit bottomed girl (FBG) actually does? How she treats her dreams, her food, her body?

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It’s cool! It’s not like FBG is defined in Webster’s Dictionary … yet, anyway. But it’s important to know that being part of our fit bottomed world actually has very little to do with the size, shape, or relative fitness of your bottom — or any other part of you, for that matter.

It’s more about attitude, because when you get yourself in the right mindset, the other things you’re looking for (weight loss, muscle tone, the ability to eat foods and live a life you really love) tend to come along with the package.

So, what would an FBG do?

She would:

  • be curious, not judgmental
  • focus on what she can add rather than subtract
  • love life with zero shame in her game
  • listen to and honor her hunger
  • respect her body
  • love herself — even her perceived faults
  • cut herself a break
  • trust her intuition
  • not take herself too seriously
  • laugh often
  • take time for herself
  • understand the importance of rest

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And she would not:

  • count calories
  • obsess about the number on the scale
  • engage in negative self talk
  • judge herself — or others
  • skip meals
  • see workouts as “work”
  • always be on the go
  • spend lots of long hours at the gym to compensate for food she’s eaten
  • restrict food for the purpose of weight loss
  • beat herself up for not adhering to any of the above, because each day is a new day and a new opportunity to grow

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Dikembe Mutombo is right — ain’t none of that allowed up in here.

Essentially, it all comes back to the idea that you can’t hate yourself healthy. When you start from a place of self-love, and you see the creation of healthy habits as a way to show yourself the love and respect you deserve rather than a way to punish your thighs for rubbing, it becomes easier to make choices that lead you down that better-for-you path.

Not totally following why we don’t consider weight loss, in and of itself, to be the best reason to embark on a healthy living journey? Remember: building a body that fits into a pair of skinny jeans can never change your life in the same way that building confidence and positive habits can. —Kristen



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13 Things to Know Before Training for Your First Ultramarathon

  Ultramarathon. It has nice ring to it, doesn’t it? Nothing inspires oohs and aahs quite like mentioning that you run them. The odds are that once you’ve got a couple of marathons under your belt, the thought will — at some point — cross your mind to try stepping up to the next distance. […]


 

Ultramarathon. It has nice ring to it, doesn’t it? Nothing inspires oohs and aahs quite like mentioning that you run them. The odds are that once you’ve got a couple of marathons under your belt, the thought will — at some point — cross your mind to try stepping up to the next distance. Wanna know how I know? I’ve done six ultras in the past three years.

Ultramarathons typically start at the 50k distance — or 31(ish) miles. Now, it’s really tempting to think of it as “just a few miles longer than a marathon” but ultras — which are typically done on trails — are a completely different animal than a road marathon. Unless your goal is to hate the experience of running your first ultra, don’t assume that your standard marathon training will do.

Here’s what you need to know.

  1. Training is the hardest part. I mean, sure, it’s tough to run 31+ miles, but it’s the grinding it out day after day after day that’s the toughest part. Staying motivated and positive through months of training through all sorts of conditions is hard — especially if you’re training alone. Honestly, if you can get through training, you’ve got the chops to get through the race.
  2. Have a training plan. You may have been able to get away with willy-nilly training for other distances, but it’s a supremely bad idea to do an ultra without a clear plan. There are free plans online (be sure they are from reputable coaches) for first-timers which you could adapt to your own schedule or — better yet — hire a coach with ultramarathon training experience to write one for you.
  3. Back-to-back “long” runs are where ultrarunners are made. This is the bread and butter of ultra training — a weekly long run that increases (similar to the way a marathon long run would increase with a mileage cutback every couple of weeks) and a second shorter “long” run the next day. The object of this second “long” run is really just to be on your feet for 60-90 minutes to learn what it feels like to have “dead legs” while still keeping your running form together.
  4. Train for your course. Research the course you’ll be running and spend some time training in similar conditions. For example, if you know that your course has a huge climb at mile 20, pick routes that have uphills toward the end of the course and/or include more hills in your second “long” run. Also, be sure to put in as many miles as possible on a similar surface to what you’ll encounter on race day.
  5. Be okay with walking. This goes double if you’ll be on trails. Road hills are built to accommodate cars so they’re never as steep as what you’ll see out there on the trails. Often, it’s far more energy efficient to walk up certain hills than it would be to run them. Also, some downhills can be steep and dangerous — especially if it’s wet out there or if you’re on loose rocks. But even in general, walking is totally acceptable on ultra courses. We all do it — seriously. Don’t try to be a hero; walk when you need to.
  6. Be ready to make sacrifices. Ultra training is a big, time-consuming commitment. No doubt somewhere along the line, you’ll get an invite for a happy hour the night before your long run. And you’ll want to go and you’ll really want a drink. I’ve totally been there — but trust me, you’ll pay for it in your run the next day. Be ready to make sacrifices for the sake of training.
  7. Recovery rituals become critical. Stretching overused muscles, foam rolling, restorative yoga, epsom salt baths, etc. become more important than ever. You can’t train if you’re too sore (or mentally burnt out) to run. Stress-relieving activities throughout your week will help your body and your mind gain resilience rather than breaking down. Be proactive with your recovery. Above all else, keep your rest/easy days sacred.
  8. Your fueling has to be on point. This is a biggie. You need to fuel and hydrate appropriately while training — it’s non-negotiable. Just because you’re running all the miles doesn’t mean can eat all the crap. On your runs, always take more fuel with you than you think you’ll need because trail conditions can vary widely. Also, consider using electrolyte tabs during your long runs to help keep muscle cramping at bay. Replenish after every run.
  9. Practice your race day strategies with your race day gear. Use the hydration pack you plan to wear on race day, consume the same energy gels/gummies, etc. Everything down to your socks should be thoroughly tested during training.
  10. Expect to have tough runs. Like any other distance, some runs will be inexplicably tough. Get through them and know that this is the mental side of training well. You have to struggle a little to become tough enough to endure whatever gets thrown at you on race day.
  11. Aid stations on the course are like mini parties. Unlike other race distances, runners actually stop at aid stations in ultras — they eat something, refill a hydration pack, have a conversation, take a seat, fix a shoelace, or put some petroleum jelly on the spots that are chaffing. Know where the aid stations are on your course and allow yourself the time to stop — it could be an hour (or more) before you see the next one.
  12. Run your own race. I mean it, eyes on your own paper! Stick with the pace and fueling that you’ve tested throughout training. Going out too fast in a half-marathon makes the last six miles suck. Going out too fast in a 50k makes the last 16 miles suck … badly. Aim to be comfortable for most of the race, moving at a pace that you feel confident you can sustain. As the final miles approach, you can always take it up a notch — but you can’t get back the energy you blow in the first 10-12 miles.
  13. Smile. It’s an adventure and an amazing accomplishment. It requires dedication and mental toughness. But it’s totally doable. And if you take the time and energy to do it right, you’ll be really glad you did it.

There are as many ways to train for an ultra as there are ultra runners. As with any distance, don’t expect that you’ll get it right your first time. Every time you complete an ultra, you gain a ton of experience — you come back next time stronger and wiser.

Be honest: did I talk you into (or out of) training for your first ultra? —Alison



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Workout I Did: Learning to Surf

We all have that one thing that we’ve always wanted to try to but for whatever reason we just haven’t. For me, that thing is surfing. I grew up in the mountains of central Pennsylvania with a family that wasn’t big on beach vacations. It wasn’t until my late 20s that I started spending any […]


We all have that one thing that we’ve always wanted to try to but for whatever reason we just haven’t. For me, that thing is surfing.

I grew up in the mountains of central Pennsylvania with a family that wasn’t big on beach vacations. It wasn’t until my late 20s that I started spending any time near the beach. And yet, the idea of surf lessons still seemed far off.

Then, on a recent trip to Myrtle Beach, my chance finally came — at age 37, I was finally about to check surfing off my bucket list. For having this on my list for so long, I still hadn’t even Googled how to surf. On the plus side, when we arrived on the beach for our morning lesson, I had zero expectations and was open to anything.

We were greeted by our surf instructors, Jack and Nick, who had laid out a variety of longboards on the beach for us. As we looked out at the ocean, Jack pointed out that there was some good ground swell from Hurricane Irma, which was approaching but still a couple days out. But, he pointed out, these are perfect wave conditions for learning to surf. One very important variable was in our favor — yay!

On the beach, Jack walked us through how to position ourselves on the board, paddle out and “pop up” from a belly-down position to standing on the board. Then we worked on refining our stance on the board — which foot goes in front, optimal distance between our feet, and how to find balance.

For people who’ve spent some time working out, the popping up maneuver should seem pretty familiar. I mean, look at this slow-mo video of me and tell that this doesn’t look like a cockeyed burpee.

Once we got that down, we headed out into the water with our instructors. We paddled through the breaking waves close to the beach and settled into a relatively calm pocket of flat water not too far off shore. Our instructors stood beside our boards as we hung out on top, waiting. And when a suitable wave approached, they would give us a push on the board toward the shore and tell us when to start paddling. When the moment was right, they’d tell us to pop up.

To my shock and surprise, on my very first wave I made it to my knees and rode the wave to shore. By my second run, I was up on my feet. From there on, I was on fire. I even caught one wave and rode it all the way into shore until I (literally) ran aground.

At this point, I was grateful for my fitness. It was exhausting to work your way through breaking waves, heave your body up onto the board, and then paddle out using only your upper body fighting the water every step of the way. If I was lucky, I’d get a minute to catch my breath before being pushed right back toward shore and popping back up onto my board. So much upper body and core work went into this process. But as tiring as it all was, I was drawn back out over and over again — totally hooked.

Despite all my success on lesson one, I don’t pretend to think I’m prepared to go beyond the safety of the breaking waves near the shoreline just yet. Everything I’ve read and heard since talks about how long and frustratingly slow the learning process is. But I do wonder — why did I wait so long to give this a shot?

Curious to try it for yourself?

Three Things You Should Know

1. Be prepared to be humbled. Surfing might look pretty, but the reality is that it’s far more difficult than it looks. I found that it was easy enough get up onto my knees out there but it took a ton more power (and courage) to get my feet on the board and then stand up. Wipeouts are inevitable — even for seasoned surfers. You’ll get tossed about by the waves and clobbered over the head with your board — it’s foam, you’ll live.

2. Wear the leash. If it’s not securely fastened, your board becomes a projectile. When you’re up on your board, the waves are trying to rip it out from under you. On a few occasions as I was going under mid-wipeout, I could feel my board being launched forward. The leash was only thing keeping me from losing my board and potentially taking someone out.

3. Start small. You begin by essentially learning to ride the whitewater, the smaller and more frequent breaking waves near the shore. This was plenty for me to deal with. What looks like a small wave from the beach looks massive at it approaches you in the water. Over time, as you get more experienced and build confidence, you’ll move farther out and away from shore.

A huge thanks to my friend Jennifer Mitchell for catching the awesome video of me!

What’s on your fitness bucket list? —Alison



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This Is the Mindset You Need to Lose Weight

If you’ve ever dieted or tried to lose weight before, you’ve likely read a lot of different advice. And a lot of books. And been to a lot of websites. And tried a lot of products. So you, like, KNOW A LOT about what it takes to lose weight. And, if you’re like a lot […]


If you’ve ever dieted or tried to lose weight before, you’ve likely read a lot of different advice. And a lot of books. And been to a lot of websites. And tried a lot of products. So you, like, KNOW A LOT about what it takes to lose weight. And, if you’re like a lot of us, probably even more about what it doesn’t.

Information can be awesome. It’s exciting to have all the facts on nutrition and studies on workouts and really learn some cool facts and strategies to help you to be your healthiest right at your fingertips. Yeah, information is power!

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Except when it isn’t.

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Stay with me for a sec.

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You can have all the facts in the world about weight-loss … and not actually lose weight. Because weight-loss isn’t just about information — it’s about putting that information into action. Which requires motivation. And … trying something different. We say this all the time in our 10 in 4 Challenge support group (learn more about how you can join the next challenge here): You can’t expect to see a change unless you make a change.

And yeah, that can be hard. Because change is hard. But it’s the truth.

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It all begins with your thoughts — and being totally and completely open to learning something new despite the fact that you know a LOT. It’s a little something we call the “beginner’s mindset.”

What Is the Beginner’s Mindset?

A beginner’s mindset is simple. Basically, you take everything you know, and you keep it in mind, but you check it at the door and open up to the possibility that you don’t know everything. You even remain open to the possibility that what you think you “know” may not actually be working for you. (Because, hey, if it was, you probably wouldn’t still be trying to reach the same goal, right?) You soften your approach to your body and your life. Even though you’re not a “beginner” in healthy living know-how world, you change your perception and accept that there’s much, much more to learn — and you’re ready to welcome it with open arms.

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How Can I Have a Beginner’s Mindset?

The first step to having a beginner’s mindset is to simply set the intention to have one. Easy, right? Take a deep breath, acknowledge (with lots of self love) that you’ve been doing the best you could up until this point, but decide that now you’re ready to grow, learn and change. It’s time to leave what’s not working for you behind and open up to new possibilities.

Then, pay attention to your thoughts. Repeated thoughts trigger emotional responses, which, in turn, result in behaviors. When behaviors are repeated, they become habits. And you guys know how important habits are. This is why thoughts are SO important.

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Whenever you start to think: “This isn’t going to work for me,” or “I already know that I need [insert food/activity/other healthy living tip you’ve relied on for however many years here],” or you just start to resist any sort of change because you “know” XYZ … lovingly remind yourself to open up and shift back to that beginner’s mindset.

Why Does a Beginner’s Mindset Help?

It takes practice and some self-awareness, but the results can be huge. Why? Because without a beginner’s mindset, change and growth in any area of your life is darn near impossible.

Think about it. If what you’ve been doing isn’t working, why would you hold on so tightly to those habits? Adopt a new open mindset and break free.

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How open are you to new ideas when it comes to healthy living? And if you guys need some extra help with this, we do a lot of breaking these patterns in the 10 in 4 Challenge, which you can get more deets for here. It’s life-changing for so many women! Jenn



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Go on a Gratitude Run

It’s safe to say that we all have stuff we’d like to change in the world — and in our lives. Like A LOT. And we should absolutely go out there and change and grow and speak our minds and make the world a better place. FOR SURE. But, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t […]


It’s safe to say that we all have stuff we’d like to change in the world — and in our lives. Like A LOT. And we should absolutely go out there and change and grow and speak our minds and make the world a better place. FOR SURE. But, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t also take a little time now and again to reflect on what we do have. Or the ways in which the world is beautiful. And just how amazing our bodies and this human experience is.

Because for every negative news story, there’s a positive one.

And we can choose to see the good, even when shit is bad. And that helps give us the energy to go out and do the stuff we need to do. Like be kind — kind to ourselves, kind to others.

Which is exactly why now is a great time to go on a gratitude run.

What’s a Gratitude Run?

It’s pretty much exactly as it sounds. Go out for your usual run. (Best if you can run outdoors, but you can also do this on a treadmill.) Except, leave your earbuds at home. Instead, really pay attention to everything around you: the air, the smells, the sights, how every single part of your body feels as it moves.

Then, with each couple of steps, think of something you’re grateful for. They can be big, important things or itty bitty things that bring you joy or comfort.

Here’s a few to get you started:

  • People (and animals) you love: Just think of ALL the people and pets you love (and have loved)!
  • Your body: There are so many things it does — thank it for all of ’em.
  • Your surroundings: Everything in your home, everything in nature, every trip you’ve ever taken, everything you see or have seen!
  • Food and drink: Lots of delicious options here. We’re looking at you, dark roast coffee (and even light roast coffee).
  • Your soul: What aspects of yourself would your loved ones say are your best? Thank yourself for all of those.

That’s it! See how long you can run without repeating one. We bet you can get through your whole run, and tomorrow’s run and the one after that … !

Check in With Yourself

After your run, do a quick check-in. How does your body feel? How does your soul feel? Do you have more energy? Do you feel lighter? End your run with a huge THANK YOU to yourself for going on a gratitude run in the first place. Because you know what? Endorphins are the best — but paired with gratitude, they’re even better.

Have you gone on a gratitude run? How did it make you feel? Tell us! I’ve found that this is seriously the best way to turn a bad day around. —Jenn



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4 Ways Yoga Helps Your Regular Workouts

Are you one of those people who doesn’t do yoga because you think it’s not a good workout? You believe that flowing through a sequence of postures simply cannot bring you the same benefit that comes from a heart-pounding cardio kettlebell and interval-training routine? Or maybe it’s the sitting still part of yoga that drives […]


Are you one of those people who doesn’t do yoga because you think it’s not a good workout? You believe that flowing through a sequence of postures simply cannot bring you the same benefit that comes from a heart-pounding cardio kettlebell and interval-training routine?

Or maybe it’s the sitting still part of yoga that drives you crazy. Those long holds which constantly kick up a sea of emotions while sending your to-do list into a swirl around your brain is not your thing.

And you probably already have a friend or two who raves on about the amazing yoga class she just came from as a preamble to her ongoing attempt to convert you to the practice. Which gets a little annoying.

Well, don’t worry! I’m not going to try and get you to become a yogi. I’m only going to explain how including yoga in your regular exercise routine —like an add-on — will not only enhance your workouts, it will also make you happier in your life.

4 Ways Yoga Helps Your Regular Workouts

1. Breathing. Enter a yoga class and there’s a good chance you’ll hear an instructor counting breaths out loud. In fact, this may even be the scope of her instruction. Why? Because breathing is the foundation of yoga. In order to truly advance through the practice, you must be connected to your breath. It enables you to use your muscles more efficiently while allowing your body to move more fluidly. And guess what? The breath will do its magic outside of a yoga class. So if you’re a runner, connecting the breath to your stride will provide an even steadiness that gives you more control.

2. Stretching. You probably already know that your body needs a good stretch post-workout. And the five minutes tacked onto the end of class is fine if you’re looking to reduce muscle soreness. But in order to prevent injury, you want your muscles to be in tip-top shape so they are flexible and receiving optimum blood flow. Yoga as a cross-training exercise will help you do this. On your rest day, consider adding in a series of poses to lengthen your muscles, which will help keep them from pulling and overuse. Also, in conjunction with the contraction that comes from activities such as weightlifting, the stretching from yoga will give you a better range of motion. Plus, being more flexible (especially as you age) feels good.

3. Stabilizing and balancing. While you don’t need to stand on your head for 10 minutes a day, working on your balance is important for both your workouts and your everyday life. The muscles engaged while balancing help stabilize the rest of your body to prevent overuse that can lead to injury. Yoga as a balance practice teaches you to ground into your center, engage your core and lengthen the spine. So if you are a cyclist or Spinner, yoga teaches you to work from this center which will improve your form, posture and core strength.

4. Mindfulness. No need to get all fancy on this term, mindfulness simply means being present — which is the equivalent to keeping your head in the game. And this is the whole purpose of yoga: to stay connected to your body and breath throughout the practice (and in the rest of your life!). The discomfort that this can cause — like unwanted emotions — can be a turn-off to many non-yoga people. But really, this is key to living a fuller and richer life. If you can keep your mind present while you’re working out, you will have better results that can help build endurance and strength along with preventing injury. While most people probably do not want to pay attention to the aching hip on a run, if you use this discomfort as a sign to slow down, or even stop running, you could be protecting yourself from a muscle tear. On the flip side, if you feel a burning sensation in your quads, and you stay with it, you’ll push past your limitations which will thrust you across the finish line in the race.

Are you convinced? How do you think yoga could enhance your regular workout? —Elysha



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5 Steps to Make Morning Workouts a Habit

It’s 6 a.m. and your alarm sounds, hopefully to the beat of your favorite song rather than one of those annoying buzzers. You’re super tempted to hit snooze (like five times) and roll over for a few more zzz’s. Before you do, think about how much better your day will play out if you kill […]


It’s 6 a.m. and your alarm sounds, hopefully to the beat of your favorite song rather than one of those annoying buzzers. You’re super tempted to hit snooze (like five times) and roll over for a few more zzz’s. Before you do, think about how much better your day will play out if you kill your workout now — rather than trying to convince yourself later after a long day at work.

Yes, it’s hard, really really hard, to get in that morning workout, but totally worth it. How many times have you said “I’m going to work out right when I get home” only to throw on your comfies and lounge the night away, binge-watching your favorite shows while eating a whole lot more than you should? Sound like most evenings?

Truth is, we work hard and at the end of the day, we’re tired. But we can’t lose sight of what’s important: ourselves. Eating right, sleeping and working out are essential to our well-being. So how do we fit this all into our day? By developing a solid routine and sticking to it. Get started with these five steps.

1. Wind Down and Prep the Night Before

A realistic goal is to start winding down around 9 p.m. (meal prep, put the dishes away, get the kids bathed and to bed, walk the dog, do your nightly beauty regimen, etc.) with lights out by 10. Whether it’s white noise, essential oils or reading a book, allow yourself time to unwind, letting go of the day’s worries. Be sure to set out your clothes, make your pre- and post-workout grub, fill the dog bowl, etc., the night before so it doesn’t become one of many potential excuses. After all: “Failure to prepare is preparing to fail.”

2. Get a Solid 7 to 9 Hours of Sleep

According to WebMD, most adults need 7 to 9 hours a night for the best amount of sleep. You have one body. Give it the rest it needs! If you feel drowsy during the day, even during boring activities, you haven’t had enough sleep, experts say. Read more about why getting a good night’s sleep matters at WebMD.

3. Make Yourself Get Up/Create a No-Phone Zone

Put your alarm across the room so that you have to get up and walk over to it in order to shut it off. This is also a good habit to get into if you use the alarm on your phone and like to use your phone at night. Phone lighting is not your friend when trying to sleep. In fact, it doesn’t hurt to make the bedroom (your oasis) a no-phone zone entirely.

4. Develop a ‘Whatever It Takes’ Attitude

Rise fully rested, throw on your gear, grab your pre-workout snack, feed the dog and get on your way. Now I realize if you have littles, this schedule may look a little different and that’s okay. It’s totally doable! Adjust and adapt to your situation. By that I mean, you may be going to bed when the kids do (i.e. 7 or 8 p.m.) so you can get up at 4 or 5 a.m. Implement the “whatever it takes” attitude and get it done. Once you have a routine in place, it becomes habit, and we all know that habits are hard to break.

5. Don’t Hesitate … Get to It and Get on With It!

Wrap up your workout, snag your post-workout snack, jump in the shower, and get on with the day. This way, once the day is done, you get to enjoy the time you earned with your loved ones rather than trying to convince yourself to get a workout in.

Are you an early bird or a night owl? —Nichole



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Can Aromatherapy Boost Your Workout?

We’re all looking for a better, more fun, more enjoyable workout. One that leaves us feeling uplifted, energized — and a bit like a badass. Okay, a lot like a badass. But, when it comes to smell — er — that’s the one thing we’re typically trying to have LESS of during a workout. However, […]


We’re all looking for a better, more fun, more enjoyable workout. One that leaves us feeling uplifted, energized — and a bit like a badass. Okay, a lot like a badass. But, when it comes to smell — er — that’s the one thing we’re typically trying to have LESS of during a workout. However, turns out the right smell, a la aromatherapy, may actually help your workout. We chatted with Tracy Griffiths — creator of Aroma Yoga, director of the Life Energy Institute and spokesperson for Young Living Essential Oils — about how and why that is, plus easy ways you can boost your next sweat sesh.

What are the benefits of incorporating aromatherapy into a workout?

“Aromatherapy, when used during a workout, helps us bring our body, mind and our intentions into the present moment, thus increasing our focus and attention on any task at hand, especially our workouts.”

How can you incorporate aromatherapy into exercise?

“Place a drop or two on the palms, gently rub the palms together, bring the cupped hands over the nose and deeply inhale, completely exhale and repeat two to five more times. As you are practicing this deep, slow breathing exercise, take this time to set your intention for your workout.”

What scents do you recommend for getting energized to move?

“The crisp scents of rosemary, peppermint or lemon can help sharpen our awareness and help us become more mentally and emotionally connected to our physical body. Because of the physiological and emotional components of the olfactory system (how our brain processes scents), we can use our sense of smell to anchor a particular feeling to a particular essential oil. So by breathing in favorite essential oils, it may trigger a positive emotional response and help us get in the ‘zone’ before working out. Most athletes know being in a positive and empowering mindset is crucial to a successful workout. Using aromatherapy in your fitness routines can be a great way to get the most out of yourself!”

Anything else we can do to boost our workouts?

“Close your eyes and visualize how you want to show up for yourself. See if you can visualize your body going through the exercises. Focusing your mind and being present can really make a difference in how you feel before, during and post workout.”

Will you try it? I’ve been using lemon oil in my diffuser to get energized to write lately. And now I’m excited to try it before I hit the gym!Jenn



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Sign Up Now: 10 in 4 Challenge Registration Open!

It’s our fave time of year again … 10 in 4 Challenge registration time! It’s been about a year since we first launched our weight-loss with self love program with one of Canada’s best trainers, Dave Smith, and, man, has it been awesome. Not only do we take a unique approach to losing weight (putting self […]


It’s our fave time of year again … 10 in 4 Challenge registration time!

It’s been about a year since we first launched our weight-loss with self love program with one of Canada’s best trainers, Dave Smith, and, man, has it been awesome. Not only do we take a unique approach to losing weight (putting self love first), but we also get results. Like 10-pounds-in-4 weeks kind of results. “After more than 50 years of dieting, this is the only plan that’s really given me the habits that work,” kind of results. It’s life-changing stuff.

Here are a few more reasons why we LOVE the 10 in 4 Challenge — and why it’s different than anything else out there.

Registration is only open until Friday, September 8, so don’t delay in signing up here! Once you’re signed up, the challenge itself will begin on Monday, September 11, and we can’t wait to have another group of women who are ready to change their lives and join the healthy party! —Jenn & Kristen



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7 Lessons Learned at the First FBG Retreat

If you’ve been reading FBG for awhile, you probably already know these things because we say them all the time … But after holding our first live retreat at 1440 Multiversity on “How to Be a Fit Bottomed Girl,” we learned a few new lessons along with our lovely attendees. And, guys, it was everything. […]


If you’ve been reading FBG for awhile, you probably already know these things because we say them all the time …

But after holding our first live retreat at 1440 Multiversity on “How to Be a Fit Bottomed Girl,” we learned a few new lessons along with our lovely attendees. And, guys, it was everything. Because being healthy isn’t just about eating healthy foods and being active. Sure, that’s a large part, but it’s also about what you think about yourself, what you think about others and how you push yourself to be your best. Not to go all Oprah on y’all, but it’s all about living YOUR best life. And no one gets to decide what exactly that means except for you. So grab your power from within, and let’s get to those life lessons!

7 Lessons Learned at the First FBG Retreat

1. You can do more than you think you can. This was the overarching theme everyone felt after this workout that we did together. Never done squat jumps? That’s cool, start with squats because there’s no shame in modifying. Never done mountain climbers? Try it. You just might be surprised at your own abilities.

2. There’s power in vulnerability. We experienced this firsthand when we shared our personal stories with dieting and body image and *maybe* shed a few tears. But that’s awesome because when you’re open and real, emotion comes out — and it’s that emotion that, when shared, lets people know that they’re not alone and that their feelings are valid and honored, too. Being real is the first step to true change.

3. You were put on this planet to do more than worry about your weight. There might have been more tears shed on this one during the retreat. And it’s because it’s such a personal message and mission for us — one that hits at the soul because it’s so true.

4. Leave space for the unexpected. We had all of our time during the retreat pretty planned out. We knew when we’d be going through slideshows, when we’d work out and when we’d hike. But 30 minutes into our retreat, our plan had to be tweaked and changed to meet the needs of the group. Which actually worked out beautifully — and ended up resulting in some really tender and precious moments with the group that weren’t planned at all.

5. Get outside. The 1440 Multiversity campus is GORGEOUS. Which we expected, but not to the degree that it really was. The piney smell of the redwoods, the crisp air, the breeze that just bowled you over with calmness. It was both relaxing and energizing — and we soaked it up at every opportunity, whether that was a hike with the group, eating outside or simply sitting on our balcony and watching the fog lift each morning.

6. If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you. Okay, yeah, we say this one in the video above, but it’s because it’s so, so, so true! And it’s one of those lines that kept coming up again and again over the weekend. And challenges don’t just lead to physical changes in your body — once you meet a challenge, it boosts your self-confidence and makes you feels unstoppable.

7. Knowledge is power but support is everything. Sure, we had slideshows detailing the science behind nutrition and exercise and self confidence and how you get results, but you know what? If you don’t have support to do those things or implement those changes in your life beyond our wonderful weekend in the woods, then it’s really hard to do. Despite having different goals and backgrounds, the women we worked with at the retreat all supported one another, and it was beautiful to see.

Ready for your own mental ah-has and body breakthroughs? We have SO much fun stuff coming up! Be sure to sign up our online weight-loss with self love program here and make sure you’re signed up to receive our FBG Life email that will keep you in the loop on all upcoming opportunities for us to be awesome together. —Jenn & Kristen



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It’s Not Fair (but You Have to Do It Anyway)

We all know that gaining weight as we age is pretty common (and that losing it becomes more difficult year after year). Dropping a few extra pounds now, in my late 30s, is a wholly different experience than it was in my 20s — and, from what I understand, it’s likely to be a completely […]


We all know that gaining weight as we age is pretty common (and that losing it becomes more difficult year after year). Dropping a few extra pounds now, in my late 30s, is a wholly different experience than it was in my 20s — and, from what I understand, it’s likely to be a completely different story when I hit 40.

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A friend of mine recently shared her experience, saying that her weight didn’t creep up when she turned 40 — it hit her like a truck. And since she was already active and stuck to a pretty healthy diet, it seemed pretty unavoidable.

But here’s the thing. Age-related weight gain is certainly common — but we shouldn’t view it as normal. Not because it’s so important to fit in a certain size or look a particular way, of course, but because added weight (especially if it continues to creep up year after year) is detrimental to our health. And if carrying that extra 10 pounds makes a difference in the way your knees feel today, you know it’s going to make a difference as those joints grow older.

So what’s a girl (or guy) to do? If you’re already following a solid eating plan and working out in ways that have kept you fit and healthy in the past, you probably feel like you should just be able to keep on doing what you do and getting the same results.

But that might not be the case, which means you’ve gotta make new, different — and potentially more challenging — changes.

I know what you’re thinking. I’m thinking it too. But …

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Rose Nyland doesn’t always get it right, but this time, she’s got a point. Life isn’t always fair.

It’s not fair that what’s always worked for you no longer does. It’s not fair that your friend is older, fitter, and can eat like a garbage disposal. It’s not fair that, in order for you to get back to a weight, size, or body that feels more like “you,” you have to make additional changes to a lifestyle that’s already healthy — and one that you love.

It’s not fair. But if your health is important to you, you have to do it anyway.

via GIPHY

Different changes work for different people — which is why we tend to have a “choose your own adventure” approach to weight loss, especially with the women who join us for our 10 in 4 Program (and we’ve got another round starting soon, in case you’re interested!). For the friend I mentioned earlier, the key was to cut out added sugar, which she found really difficult, but the payoff was immediate. The tweak that I, personally, find super effective is to take a veggies-first approach to snacks and meals.

For others, it might mean adjusting portion sizes or changing up the ratio of, say, protein to carbs; or maybe it’ll take eating at home more frequently, or incorporating HIIT or strength training into their routine. Maybe it even involves taking a look at their DNA to see what foods and workouts are truly most effective for their personal weight-loss goals — and stay tuned, because we’re going to have some extremely cool opportunities for you guys to do just that coming up later this year, if you’re interested. We seriously live in the future, y’all.

If this is something you’re struggling with, then work with me to take the “it’s not fair” argument out of the equation. Because, honestly?

via GIPHY

Joey, like Rose, is spot on. It might not be fair, but … that doesn’t actually matter. What matters is that you are worth taking care of. If it doesn’t challenge you, it won’t change you. So let’s challenge ourselves already!

Is there one small, sustainable tweak that comes to mind that you could make — starting today? —Kristen



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How a Flatlander Trains to Run Up a Mountain

FBGs, welcome our newest contributor: Nichole Curran! Nichole is a thrill-seeking two-time Ironman triathlete and Ironman 70.3 World Championship qualifier, and today she’s sharing the new challenge she’s taking on — Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon — and how she’s training for it even though she lives far from the mountains! According to the Merriam-Webster […]


FBGs, welcome our newest contributor: Nichole Curran! Nichole is a thrill-seeking two-time Ironman triathlete and Ironman 70.3 World Championship qualifier, and today she’s sharing the new challenge she’s taking on — Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon — and how she’s training for it even though she lives far from the mountains!

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, flatland is defined as “a region in which the land is predominantly flat and lacks significant variation in elevation.”

Wiktionary breaks it down further, describing a flatlander as “a person who lives at low altitude (used by those living at higher altitudes).”

Now I may be mistaken, but this Kansas City girl thinks walking to the mailbox and back is quite the uphill climb … no?

So a flatlander I am.

Let’s Do Something Crazy

Apparently finishing two Ironmans and a handful of half Ironmans wasn’t enough. What’s a thrill-seeking, endurance-junkie, always-looking-for-the-next-big-challenge FBG to do next?

If you’re me, you find yourself out on a leisurely group trail run with your girls, talking about life, taking in nature, thinking about what you’re going to eat later, and then out comes: “Let’s run a up a mountain!”

A mountain? Where is such mountain?

This particular mountain is Pikes Peak, located just outside Colorado Springs, Colo. It’s the highest summit of the southern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains.

What could possibly be going on there? Only the toughest half marathon in America: Pikes Peak Ascent.

Halfmarathons.net breaks it down for us: “You’ll run literally up the side of a mountain at this race, which starts at 6,300 feet above sea level and climbs all the way to 14,115 feet.” A fourteener! “Temperatures at the start can rise to the 90s during the day, while runners might face near-freezing weather at the summit.”

Game on.

How to Train for Running Up a Mountain (When You Have No Mountains Around)

Being a flatlander, how on earth do you train to run up a mountain? Raw answer: the best you can! Here are a few more tips …

1. Utilize any and every resource you have available. You know that friend who randomly has an altitude-training mask (yep, the one that makes you look like the evil Bain character on Batman)? Borrow it!

I’m pretty sure I gave many children nightmares, but a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do! Strap it on, turn up the altitude and go for it! This thing will literally leave you breathless. There were times it caused me to have minor panic attacks. ripping it off as quickly as I could. But you know what? I didn’t give up. I put it right back on and I went further the next round. Push yourself!

2. Train on stairs. How about those Rocky Balboa wanna-be stairs downtown? Run them … REPEATEDLY! Wake up those muscles that have been hibernating and climb your heart out! Want a more intense stair workout? Skip a step and stride! It’s a killer.

3. Hit the trails. Lots and lots of trails! Look down. Trails make you focus by eyeing each and every step. You never know when you’ll encounter a rock, tree root or animal(!). Hence, running trails trains you to be alert and aware.

4. Stay safe. Safety first! Never run secluded trails alone. The buddy system doesn’t just keep you safe from other unsavory characters, but also, if you were to take a tumble or roll your ankle, you’d want the comfort of knowing someone was there to help.

5. Train in the heat. The temps are still hot. Take advantage! Lather up and (safely) get your heat training on. Check out this Runner’s World article for more.

6. Fuel properly. All that training (especially in the heat) can be hard on the body. So be sure to fuel properly with these tips and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate with these tips.

7. Focus on mind over matter. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t absolutely terrified to take on this beast of a race. I mean shaking-in-my-boots, wanna-run-away-and-hide kind of terrified. If there’s one thing I’ve learned throughout my years of racing, it’s all about mindset. Yes, it’s going to be hard. Yes, it’s going to hurt (like hell). Yes, I’m going to want to quit. BUT I didn’t come this far and train this hard for nothing.

I’m a true believer that if you think positive, positive things will happen. Vice versa, if you think negative, negative things will happen. The moment those “I can’ts” start to creep in, shut ’em down. YOU CAN! Of course things will happen that are out of our control and we must know our body well enough to listen when it’s talking. Push your limits, but know your limits.

With that being said, put your go-getter attitude on, check your fears at the door and get it done! You have three options … give up, give in or give it all you got.

And stay tuned for the upcoming race recap … I can’t wait to share how the race goes!Nichole



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Life Lessons Learned From Stand-Up Paddleboard Yoga

I LOVE Athleta catalogs. The women shown are strong, athletic and diverse. They’ve always shown women paddleboarding and I honestly thought I wouldn’t have the opportunity to try it unless I were to go to the ocean. But then a friend of mine recently got her stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga certification (Positive Vibes SUP + […]


I LOVE Athleta catalogs. The women shown are strong, athletic and diverse. They’ve always shown women paddleboarding and I honestly thought I wouldn’t have the opportunity to try it unless I were to go to the ocean. But then a friend of mine recently got her stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga certification (Positive Vibes SUP + Fit) and brought it to Kansas City!

As soon as I saw a date and time on the schedule that I knew I could make, I signed up.

Of course, there were the hesitations. What do I wear? It’s yoga. On water. I was positive I didn’t want to be doing yoga in a swimsuit and she said wear anything I wouldn’t mind getting wet. Check. Then I asked how stable the boards are and she said if you can stand on one foot on dry land you can do SUP yoga. Check.

The day of the class I realized that I wasn’t as nervous about falling in as I was about getting back up on the board. Would I be able to do that or would I be stuck in the water?

When I was out on the water, I realized there are so many ways that this experience mirrors life. There’s the thrill of something new and exciting. There’s the uncertainty leading up to it: Will I fail? Will I recover? Then there was the easing in. And then there was the instability as I was learning something new while applying all my previous experience to this situation. And finally came relief and eventual trust of myself and the board.

About halfway through the class I realized I had a lot more room for movement than I realized. And I was able to take bigger risks. Relax more. Laugh more. Learn to trust myself more.

Then it was over and time to go back to shore.

The day I went might have been the windiest day all month, so on the way back to shore, there was the feeling of getting stuck in the middle of the water going against the wind, no matter how hard I paddled. And I just kept paddling and started moving again and eventually I was back on dry land. Back in my comfort zone, just like real life. Being stuck and working through it.

But I did it. I did this new thing I didn’t think I would ever have a chance to do and I learned about myself and how it would have been so easy to not go. In fact, there were two people who didn’t show up to the class. And there were two people who didn’t show up to the class the night before. So fear could have definitely taken over, but I decided that it was more important to walk through it than it was to hold back.

While I did this new thing, was it scary? Not really. There was a warrior pose that was more unstable than I would have liked, but I modified it and was fine. I survived.

It was the fear of not getting back on the board that was scary — just like life. The fear of not being able to recover from upset is much worse than the actual experience ever is. We learn to move on and get through it and we survive, proving to ourselves how brave we are. And isn’t that what life is? Trying new things and learning to move past the fear? And then choosing to continue living that life, instead of the one based on fear.

The next time I go, I’ll push myself harder and see what happens. I’ll give myself a greater opportunity to fall so I can also give myself the chance to get back on the board.

What life lessons have you learned from new experiences? —Cati



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Why Do You Exercise?

I can proudly say that exercise has been a part of my life for a long time. Of course there have been ups and downs, but the important thing is I have stuck with it, and somewhere along the line it became an integral part of who I am. And I couldn’t be happier! But […]


I can proudly say that exercise has been a part of my life for a long time. Of course there have been ups and downs, but the important thing is I have stuck with it, and somewhere along the line it became an integral part of who I am. And I couldn’t be happier! But how does one keep it going? Where do you get the motivation to give up part of your day, year after year, for 39 years? Motivation Through The Decades Teens: Luckily I had a great role model. Mom wasn’t the type to let you lounge around …

The post Why Do You Exercise? appeared first on Fit Bottomed Girls.



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That Time I Went to the Gym But Came Home and Lifted Wine Bottles Instead

I recently joined Planet Fitness. I’ve been struggling with my exercise regimen recently, so I was excited for the option to have the personal trainer there create a workout for me. The trainer and I met a few weeks ago to create my plan. We decided I’d do 2-3 days per week of cardio for […]


I recently joined Planet Fitness. I’ve been struggling with my exercise regimen recently, so I was excited for the option to have the personal trainer there create a workout for me.

The trainer and I met a few weeks ago to create my plan. We decided I’d do 2-3 days per week of cardio for 40-60 minutes. I have that covered with my weekly indoor soccer games, so that’s perfect for me. On non-cardio days, at least twice a week, I would do the strength workout he designed. I was nervous for this because I’m not used to using anything other than cardio machines.

My first try went like this …

I started with 5-10 minutes on the stair climber, which was great. I’m comfortable with that. It’s like cardio on steroids. It definitely gets my heart rate going. And from way up there, I could scope out the next stuff I needed to do. This was important because it was really busy that evening.

After that warm-up, it was time to move on to the weight machines. I’m less comfortable with them, but it’s a “judgment free zone,” so it doesn’t matter if I stand and look at the pictures on the machines a little longer than necessary to fully understand what to do. But first, I had to find an available machine I was supposed to use. That was pretty challenging considering how packed it was (at 8:30 p.m. on a Tuesday). Almost every machine was taken.

I could pick out most of the machines I needed. I spotted the leg press, but it was busy. I moved on to the glute extension. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was supposed to alternate my sets between leg presses and glute extensions. That didn’t happen. I did three sets of 10 reps on each leg at the glute extension machine. I went back to the leg press when it was free.

I tried to go to the hip adduction and abduction machines next, but I didn’t realize I sat down where a girl already had her things. She was about to wipe the machine down, so I moved on. I came back later and did two sets of 15 on each machine. Again, I didn’t realize I was supposed to be alternating sets. I did them consecutively.

I moved on to the lat pull down machine. And, yep, you guessed it, I was supposed to be alternating. This time should’ve been with the chest fly machine, but I couldn’t find it. I did three sets of 12 reps on the lat pull down.

I gave up on finding the chest fly machine and went to the free weight section. But I panicked. I had never used free weights on the gym floor before. I had used them in group classes, but that always includes a lot of guidance. I watched one girl who looked really serious for a while. I got more nervous.

I knew I was supposed to do three sets of 10 curl and presses, three sets of 10 tricep lifts, and three sets of 10 front raises. I had to check with my fiancé Evan, who has an exercise science degree and much more experience weight lifting than me, before I went to the gym to make sure I knew what each of those movements was. I did. But when it came time to do them, I chickened out. I wanted to be efficient and use both arms at the same time, but I didn’t know if that was normal. And it was crowded. And I had been there for a long time already. And I was tired, but mostly, I was intimidated.

So I left.

I decided to finish my routine in the comfort of my own home. I thought we might have free weights, but I wasn’t sure. I couldn’t find them when I got home, so I improvised. I grabbed the only things I could think of that were shaped the same and were kind of acceptable in weight: wine bottles. I weighed them on my kitchen scale. They were only 2.5 lb each, but hey, they got the job done.

I did my curl and presses, my tricep lifts and my front raises. I finished out with two sets of planks for 30 seconds each and 30 v-ups (a crunch with legs extended in the air).

I felt pretty silly for getting scared and leaving the gym, but I was also pleased with myself for finishing the workout, even if it meant sort of making it up.

I went back later that week and did the full workout. Evan helped me through it. I now know what to do for next time, and I definitely know to avoid the busy times to feel more comfortable. I don’t think I’ll need to use the wine bottles again, but in a pinch, they’re better than nothing.

Have you ever had a first-time-at-a-new-gym experience like this? Ever lifted wine bottles? Do tell! —Megan



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How to Keep Your Metabolism Burning Long After You Leave the Gym

Love the feeling that comes with a really great workout? Hey, us, too! And today, in this guest post, Brent Frayser — a media relations representative for Orangetheory Fitness and a graduate of the University of Mississippi with a bachelor’s degree in  business administration — is telling us how to get our burn on both in […]


Love the feeling that comes with a really great workout? Hey, us, too! And today, in this guest post, Brent Frayser — a media relations representative for Orangetheory Fitness and a graduate of the University of Mississippi with a bachelor’s degree in  business administration — is telling us how to get our burn on both in and out of the gym, all day long. Brent was born and raised in the South and is very outgoing, with a strong sense of determination. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, writing, coaching baseball and football, and spending time with family and friends. Read on for his best metabolism-boosting tips!

To stay in good shape, most people need to eat healthy and exercise on a regular basis. But, most people do not have a lot of time to spend in the gym. Fortunately, there are lots of ways to stay active and get that metabolism going, even when you’re away from the gym!

Do High-Intensity Workouts

My first tip is to do high-intensity workouts. High-intensity workouts, such as those that are done in classes by Orangetheory Fitness, make your body work as hard as possible during a shorter exercise session. When doing a high-intensity workout, you will likely only have to exercise at a high intensity for 20 to 30 minutes, five days per week. This is much shorter than some workout routines that suggest doing more than one hour of exercise at a time at a lower intensity.

Lift Weights

Another tip that can keep you burning is to lift weights. The process of lifting weights can be intense, which leads to short bursts of hard activity. This process alone is considered a high-intensity workout. But, lifting weights regularly will help you to build lean muscle mass, which burns far more calories than fat. This means that the more muscle you build by lifting weights, the more you will burn fat once you are away from the gym. You should focus on lifting weights at least twice per week, hitting the major muscle groups (legs, back and chest).

Find Time to Move

Think outside the gym and find time to move during the day. While you will burn the most amount of calories during a good workout, most people can still find a few times throughout the rest of the day to bump up their activity. Ideally, you should find a way to go for a quick 5-minute walk or do another task, getting your heart rate up every hour. While these mini workouts may seem small, they really add up by the end of the day!

Stay Hydrated

One of the most important tips is to stay hydrated, both during your workout and afterward. All adults should try to get at least 64 ounces of water on a daily basis. This can help to prevent short-term dehydration, which has been shown to slow your metabolism. Furthermore, drinking water can help prevent you from feeling hungry, which can help you avoid snacking during the day.

Nail Your Nutrition

It’s also important that you follow a healthy diet. Focus on eating plenty of whole grains, proteins, and fruits and vegetables. This will give your body plenty of fiber, which will keep you feeling full and energized. Furthermore, avoid eating added sugar and processed carbs, particularly during the first hour after you have completed a workout.

What’s your favorite way to burn … and burn … and burn? Brent Frayser



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More Than Mirror Muscles

  Whenever I hear someone talking about how hard they’re working on getting cut abs or killer shoulders, I always think of the trainers working with those folks. I mean, I totally understand that it’s tempting to really just focus on those mirror muscles — you know, the ones you tend to see when you […]


 

Whenever I hear someone talking about how hard they’re working on getting cut abs or killer shoulders, I always think of the trainers working with those folks. I mean, I totally understand that it’s tempting to really just focus on those mirror muscles — you know, the ones you tend to see when you look in the mirror — but if you’re going for overall health and not just a really hot sweaty selfie, you’ve gotta work the whole body. And if you’re the trainer working with somebody who’s laser focused on one body part, how do you convince them to embrace a full-body workout?

Well, Margo and I recently had a chance to chat with Reggie Chambers, a New York-based trainer known for having a unique approach to each client to help them meet their goals and expectations, about just that, and his answer was kind of brilliant:

“I give them what they want, then I give them what they need.”

He explained the importance of keeping your workouts symmetrical, so if someone comes in really wanting an ab workout, he makes sure to work their lower back as well. And he also suggested learning to embrace the full-body moves that everybody loves to hate: burpees and Turkish get-ups.

Think you can apply this to your own workouts? I know it’s easy for me to do the moves I want to do, but it takes way more motivation to move on and do the things I know I need to do … like foam rolling my IT bands. UGH. Kristen



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Meet the Mom Who Plans to Run 100 Miles in 24 Hours

In a few days, on June 24 and 25, 48-year-old mom Bree Lambert will run The Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run. As if that accomplishment itself weren’t impressive, inspiring, exhausting, challenging or simply amazing enough, her goal is to finish with a time under 24 hours. If you’re not familiar with this racing format (or maybe even […]


In a few days, on June 24 and 25, 48-year-old mom Bree Lambert will run The Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run. As if that accomplishment itself weren’t impressive, inspiring, exhausting, challenging or simply amazing enough, her goal is to finish with a time under 24 hours.

If you’re not familiar with this racing format (or maybe even if you are!), this can be difficult to truly conceptualize. The average finishing time for females in 2014 for a 100-mile race was 28 hours and 34 minutes. But still, the harder part to understand is what that experience is really like.

The course covers rugged mountain trails from Squaw Valley to Auburn, Cali. (or basically Lake Tahoe to Sacramento). Competitors will run through freezing temperatures high in the mountains to temperatures greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the desert.

Bree Lambert is the USA Track and Field Masters Ultra Runner of the Year (Mountain Division), and she took the time to share some insight into her race preparation ahead of her 70th ultramarathon and second time running this race. 

Bree has spent the past six months preparing for this race. She ran a 50-km (31-mile) race in February, a 50-mile race in April, and another 50-km in May. She runs about 65 miles per week. She regularly mixes in hilly trail climbing, long runs and 8- to 10-mile tempo road runs.

Some of the most important aspects of finishing a race like this include mental toughness, nutritional planning and pacing strategy.

“The physical component is important,” she says, “but if you don’t know how to fuel right and pace properly, your fitness ultimately won’t matter.”

She has a crew of five people plus her husband and 16-year-old daughter to help her stay on track during the race. The team keeps her properly fueled (with avocados, nut butter wraps, bars and soup, in addition to amino acid supplements), and her family will literally keep her on track by finishing out the last 38 and 2 miles respectively. Bree is especially excited about her daughter’s participation.

Bree always makes time for her daughter despite her demanding schedule.

“We always carve out mother-daughter time,” she says. “She knows she is top priority, and if there is ever a conflict with a race or training plan that might interfere with something that matters, I do not hesitate for a second to change what I am doing to accommodate her schedule.”

Not only is Bree a competitive racer and dedicated mom, she is also a trainer and nutritionist. To achieve balance with so many “moving parts,” as she calls them, she practices her mantra: Live well. Bree eats a predominantly plant-based diet, but she says she craves protein after races and usually eats a good turkey burger and french fries.

If you’re still wondering what could possibly make someone want to run 100 miles (more than once!?), wonder no more: Bree is passionate about running and finds it therapeutic. She focuses on her mantra.

“If we can allow ourselves to stretch our minds a bit more and embrace the discomfort of what we are facing (and) believe we can get to the finish line,” she says, “what we discover is an ability to grow and experience what might otherwise have seemed impossible.”

While running, she practices gratitude.

“It helps me put things in perspective when I hit a low point,” she says. “I have overcome so much in my life and pinch myself that I get to live this incredible life doing what I love. I am still blown away.”

She says the best advice she has ever received was from her husband: “Run your own race.” She offered some of her own advice to all runners: “Go face your mountains, and climb them one at a time. Endurance is developed over time at the cost of hard work and discomfort, but it’s so worth it.”

Good luck in this incredible endeavor, Bree!

Would you ever consider running an endurance race like this? What do you think of Bree’s experience and advice? —Megan 



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